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Dauenhauer Tlingit Oral Literature Collection

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

Items 1-73, Tapes 1-60.

Items 74-154, Tapes 61-128.

Items 155-235, Tapes 129-189.

Items 236-315, Tapes 190-259.

Items 316-415, Tapes 260-348.

Items 416-513, Tapes 348-415.

Items 514-  , Tapes 423-

Duplicate copies of CDs from the collection, originally used for the 2011-2013 IMLS Enhancement Grant review process, but saved as a second copy.

Documents concerning the review of these recordings via a 2011-2013 IMLS Enhancement Grant.



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Dauenhauer Tlingit Oral Literature Collection, 1899-1999 | Sealaska Heritage Institute Archives

By Zachary R. Jones, Archivist

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Collection Overview

Title: Dauenhauer Tlingit Oral Literature Collection, 1899-1999Add to your cart.

ID: MC/005

Primary Creator: Dauenhauer, Nora Marks (1927-)

Other Creators: Dauenhauer, Richard L. (1942-2014)

Extent: 9.0 Boxes

Date Acquired: 11/13/2012

Subjects: Tlingit Indians--History., Tlingit language.

Languages: English, Tlingit

Scope and Contents of the Materials

This collection contains approximately 500 audio recordings on CD, which were collected or created by scholars Nora Marks Dauenhauer and Richard Dauenhauer. These recordings date from 1899 to 1999, contain speaking in English and Tlingit (the bulk in Tlingit), and document a vast array of subjects and topics concerning Tlingit history, culture, subsistence, land issues, language  and other aspects of importance relative to the Tlingit. The recordings capture the words of Tlingit elders, orators, activists, cultural specialists, and others, as well as the audio from various conferences, Tlingit gatherings and events, and other cultural programs. These recordings are very rich with content and contain important information about the Tlingit people.

The CDs that comprise this collection were obtained from the Dauenhauers, after University of Alaska Southeast staff migrated these recordings to CD format per grant funding. The Dauenhauers retain the original format recordings (reels, cassettes, etc.). The CDs contained a numbering system kept by the Dauenhauers, found on these CDs upon donation to SHI, and SHI archival staff has retained this numbering system, which is reflected in the inventory. Descriptive information about the content of the recordings, which are labeled on individual CDs, has also been retained. When requesting a recording from this collection, please include the Item number and the Tape number to assist staff in locating the recording.

From 2011 to 2013 via an IMLS Enhancement Grant, recordings in this collection with limited to no descriptive information were reviewed by fluent Tlingit speakers, who provided detailed feedback. Item descriptions were updated from this feedback, providing a better documentation of this collection for the public. These fluent speaking reviewers primarily included David Katzeek (Shangukeidí Clan) of Klukwan, Fred White (Shangukeidí Clan) of Yakutat, and Marsha Hotch (Gaanaxteidí Clan) of Klukwan. The final box in the collection contains documents from some their reviews, which can greatly assist researchers in understanding additional details of the recordings.

In 2012 SHI received a document from the Dauenhauers that detailed the contents of part of the collection, with recordings description primarily from Nora Marks Dauenhauer. Description by Nora has been noted as ‘content by NMD’.

Biographical Note

Nora Marks Dauenhauer (b. 1927) is an American poet, short-story writer, and a scholar of the language and traditions of the Tlingit Indians of Southeast Alaska. Nora Marks herself is Tlingit, and was born May 8, 1927, the first of sixteen children of Emma Marks (1913-2006) of Yakutat, Alaska, and Willie Marks (1902-1981), a Tlingit from near Juneau, Alaska. Nora's Tlingit name at birth was Keixwnéi, and following her mother in the Tlingit matrilineal system, she is a member of the Raven moiety, L’ukaax.ádi clan, and of the Shaka Hít or Canoe Prow House, from Alsek River. Emma's maternal grandfather had been Frank Italio (1870-1956), an informant to the anthropologist Frederica de Laguna whose knowledge was incorporated into De Laguna's 1972 ethnography of the northern Tlingit, Under Mount St. Elias. In circa 1972 Nora was selected and endorsed by Tlingit elders to document the Tlingit culture, and since that time Nora collected recordings and interviewed Tlingit elders. Nora earned a degree in anthropology and, with her husband Richard Dauenhauer, a poet and translator, she has authored numerous articles and also co-edited the Sealaska Heritage Institute's highly regarded four volume Classics of Tlingit Oral Literature series, titles which includes, Haa Shuká, Our Ancestors: Tlingit Oral Narratives (1987), Haa Tuwanáagu Yís, for Healing Our Spirit: Tlingit Oratory (1992), Haa Kusteeyí, Our Culture: Tlingit Life Stories. (1994), and Anóoshi Lingít Aaní Ká: Russians in Tlingit America, The Battles of Sitka 1802 and 1804 (2009).

Subject/Index Terms

Tlingit Indians--History.
Tlingit language.

Administrative Information

Repository: Sealaska Heritage Institute Archives

Use Restrictions: Intellectual Properties Note: Since SHI adheres to the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials, and since we desire to honor Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian traditional cultural belief that clans retain the intellectual property rights to clan stories or songs, patrons who use or study clan songs or stories are asked to credit clan ownership to stories and songs.

Acquisition Source: Nora Marks Dauenhauer

Acquisition Method: The materials in this collection were received by SHI in various batches between 2008 and 2012 from Richard L. Dauenhauer and Nora Marks Dauenhauer. They signed an official deed of gift on Nov. 13, 2012. Regarding specific accessions, Items 1-314 (Tapes 1-258) were received on November 15, 2008, Items 315-335 (Tapes 258-280) on November 4, 2009, Items 336-350 (Tapes 292-299) on August 20, 2010, Items 336-384 (Tapes 300-340) on November 3, 2010, Items 385-526 (Tapes 341-430) on January 30, 2012.

Preferred Citation: MC 5, Item #, Tape #, Dauenhauer Tlingit Oral Literature Collection, Sealaska Heritage Institute Archives, Juneau, Alaska

Processing Information: Processed by: Rick Huteson, Archival Assistant, & Zachary Jones, Archivist


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Box:

[Box 1: Items 1-73, Tapes 1-60.],
[Box 2: Items 74-154, Tapes 61-128.],
[Box 3: Items 155-235, Tapes 129-189.],
[Box 4: Items 236-315, Tapes 190-259.],
[Box 5: Items 316-415, Tapes 260-348.],
[Box 6: Items 416-513, Tapes 348-415.],
[Box 7: Items 514-  , Tapes 423-],
[Box 8: Duplicate copies of CDs from the collection, originally used for the 2011-2013 IMLS Enhancement Grant review process, but saved as a second copy.],
[Box 9: Documents concerning the review of these recordings via a 2011-2013 IMLS Enhancement Grant.],
[All]

Box 6: Items 416-513, Tapes 348-415.Add to your cart.

Item 416:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 348, Side 2. Susie James (Gaanax.ádi), “Daa k’I keena,” Sitka, May 31, 1973, interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer, migrated from cassette to CD. Length 43:41. Speaking in Tlingit. Quality of audio content is fair to poor, comprising audibility. Content includes; begins with a story about a Whale and Raven, a land otter canoe of the Kaagwaantaan; discussion of Tlingit law and compensation for wrongs; the cost of education and CCTHITA; discussion of travel to Klukwan and seal oil; mention of the Tlingit village near Haines known as 4-mile; mention of how the Tlingit women of Haines and Klukwan were hunted and preyed upon by the U.S. soldiers that came to the area, the need for this to be documented and investigated; discussion of how Chilkoot was established and settled.

Item 417:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 349. Susie James (Kaaxsgeiy), labeled “Yuwaan Gageets” [frog princess story], undated but likely continued from previous; May 31, 1973, interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer. 26 minutes in length. Audio quality is fair. Speaking in Tlingit. Content includes Susie telling the story of Yuwaan Gageets, with comments from Nora. For more information on Yuwaan Gageets, see Dauenhauer and Dauenhauer, “Tracking Yuwaan Gageets: A Russian Fairy Tale in Tlingit Oral Tradition,” in Native American Oral Traditions: Collaboration and Tradition, by Barre Toelken (USU Press, 2001), 58-91.

Item 418:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 350, Side 1. Susie James, recorded at Sitka, perhaps May 31, 1971. 60 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. Audio quality is poor. Interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer. Content includes; the Glacier Bay story of how a woman called the glacier, which lead to its advance. This is a Chookaneidi family story. Published in Haa Shuka; James sings a Chookaneidi memorial song about those leaving their homes as the glacier advanced; Nora and Susie sing another Chookaneidi song (Nora is a daughter of the Chookaneidi).

Item 419:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 350, Side 2. Susie James, undated, likely continued from previous recording. 50 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. Audio quality is poor. Content entails a discussion about disagreements between clans and family, audibility is poor, but the Kaagwaantaan and Chookaneidi are mentioned; James is emotional in this recording.

Item 420:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 352, Side 2. John and Emma Marks, June 4, 1972; and David Kadashan, August 10, 1972. 16 minutes in length.

Item 421:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 353, Side 1. Charlie Jim (Deisheetaan Clan) (b. 1912), recording dated 11/10/1987, recorded at Angoon. Content Note: Richard and Nora Dauenhauer interview Charlie Jim about his life, his heritage, his education, and work. 39 minutes in length.  Speaking is almost entirely in Tlingit. Notes from fluent speaker review in 2012 (see also expanded notes in file): Opens by speaking about the origins of Angoon and its clan houses; speaks on Deisheetaan at.óowu, fishing, the value of shamans, discussion on posterity and limited entry enrollment, basketball, his involvement with ANB and land claims, his work with CCTHITA, and the Tlingit educational system.

Item 422:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 354, Side A. Tom Jimmy and his wife, April 27, 1970, Klukwan, Alaska. Labeled “Origin of Shangukeidí.” 29 minutes in length. Recording in the Tlingit language. Content includes; speaking about the origins of the Shangukeidí Clan (speaking as a clan leader); he then sings a Chookaneidi song about the ice covering a Glacier Bay village; discussion about versions of the name of Shangukeidí; mention of the Thunderbird screen at the State Museum; and then a general discussion about drum making with moose and other hide types.

Item 423:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 355, Side 1. A.P. Johnson, 1971. Labeled “thanks for the reader.” 10 minutes in length.

Item 424:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 356, Side A. Labeled inaccurately as “A.P. Johnson, Sheldon Jackson College, Sitka, August 20, 1983.” However, recording opens with Thomas Thornton explaining the recording’s content’s, including a bear song and story by Charlie Joseph, July 1990, Angoon. Near 3 minutes in length.

Item 425:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 357, Side A. In accurately labeled “Charlie Joseph Sr., Bear Song, recorded by Thomas Thornton in Angoon, July 1990,” however, it is actually as A.P. Johnson speaking at Sheldon Jackson College, Sitka, August 20, 1983. Speaking primarily in English. 40 minutes in length.

Item 426:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 358, Side B. Mrs. J.C. Johnson [Mrs. M.C. Johnson ?], Hoonah, July 21, 1971. Recorded by Nora Florendo and Johnny Marks. 31 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. Audio quality is poor. Content by DK: Johnny Marks asking question, recording goes blank, 0-2:14; Johnson sings the Lukaax.adi song “Ch´aadei Yei Oonatigaa”, 2:15-3:05; general conversation with background noise, 3:06-8:35; partial singing of spiritual chant, singing of a second song that was originally sung for James Klanott [Thlaunaut] (Gunxaa Kúwakaan); 9:22-10:53; continued singing of additional songs, including Aa nahei, to end of recording.

Item 427:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 359, Side A. Herman Kitka (Kaagwaantaan), Feb. 28, 1996. Recorded by Nora Florendo. 47 minutes in length. Content includes: Kitka begins with a migration story, a story of the ancient Tlingit migrating north from as far south as Mexico, then moving into the story of Naatsilanei, 0 – 14:59; discussion about the Killer Whale House that was built in Klukwan, disagreement settled by a peace ceremony [later], 15:00-20:21; speaking about the origin of the Kaagwaantaan name; 22”31-23:40; story about the origin of the name Tongass [Tágwas]; Kitka states that the Teikweidí were formerly a Kaagwaantaan family [this claim has been attributed as controversial] then general conversation, mention of being raised by his uncles, 26:57-31:22; story on the origin of the Lukaax.ádi name, 31:35-34:33; general conversation continues thereafter to the conclusion of the recording.

Item 428:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 359, Side B. Herman Kitka, Feb. 28, 1996. Recorded by Nora Florendo. 30 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit and English. Content by DK: story of the origin of the Yanyeidi name, followed by general conversation, 0-10:01; Kitka speaks about family history and family relations, 10:02-25:02; a Raven story is told, a story about raven putting on a hat of clouds, after the raven offends the eagle, 25:03-27:09; Kitka states he loaned money to Shee Atika corporation, 27:09 to end.

Item 429a:          Oral Literature Collection, Tapes 360, Side A. Amy Marvin (Chookaneidí Clan, Nanaa Hit), Hoonah, June 5, 1986, interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer (Johnny Marks is present also).  46 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. Opening of recording contains 2 minutes of unassociated material. Content review by DK: Marvin speaks and answers questions about her life history 3:01 -13:15; Marvin responds about how she learned to drum and sing, speaks about cultural gatherings, her father’s people, the influx of Christianity, 13:13-17:01; inquiry about clan houses and general conversation, mention of Russian orthodoxy, 18:13-21:44, Marvin speaks about songs, intellectual property nature of songs, 21:44-25:37; Marvin responds to questions about her life history, cannery work, being a weaver, being a mother, her father’s grave being moved without her permission, and difficulties of land claims lawyers, 25:37-33:21; speaking about issues associated with the Central Council of Tlingit & Haida Indians of Alaska, 34:24-36:50; discussion and concern about Smoke House property, 36:50-38:56; words about Marvin’s time working at the Hoonah school with Ida Kadashan, 38:56-43:32; song chant, 43:33-45:30. Recording ends. Notes in file.

Item 429b:          Oral Literature Collection, Tapes 360, Side B. Amy Marvin, Hoonah, June 5, 1986.  46 minutes in length. Primarily all songs in Tlingit.

Item 430:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 361, Side B. Topsy Martin (Naakeelaan) (Coho/Raven), Kake, Nov. 12, 1992. 32 minutes in length. Speaking and singing entirely in Tlingit. Content includes; detailed discussion on Tlingit family relationships, roles of family members, maternal roles, grandparent roles, and the role of the Naakaaní; origins and stories of the Tsaagweidí and their settling at Kake; Topsy speaks about the origins and history of his name.

Item 431:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 362, Side A. Labeled “William Nelson on Eli Katanook, recorded by Sergei Kan, Summer 1980. 31 minutes in length. Speaking in English.

Item 432:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 362, Side B. Labeled “William Nelson on Eli Katanook, recorded by Sergei Kan, Summer 1980. 18 minutes in length. Speaking in English.

Item 433:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 363, Side A. Joe Paddock, Sitka, April 20, 1993. 32 minutes in length. Speaking in English. Oral history about his and his family’s lives.

Item 434:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 363, Side B. Joe Paddock, Sitka, April 20, 1993. 19 minutes in length. Speaking in English. Oral history about his and his family’s lives.

Item 435:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 364, Side A. Albert Paddy, Klukwan, April 26, 2001. 31 minutes in length. [two copies] Speaking in English.

Item 436:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 364, Side B. Albert Paddy, Klukwan, April 26, 2001. 31 minutes in length. [two copies]

Item 437:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 365, Side A. Albert Paddy, Klukwan, April 26, 2001. Cassette 2. 31 minutes in length.

Item 438:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 365, Side B. Albert Paddy, Klukwan, April 26, 2001. Cassette 2. 31 minutes in length.

Item 439:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 366, Side A. Albert Paddy, Klukwan, April 26, 2001. Cassette 3. 46 minutes in length.

Item 440:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 367, Side A. William Paul Sr., June 22 or 23, 1971, reading his autobiography. 31 minutes in length.

Item 441:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 367, Side B. William Paul Sr., June 22 or 23, 1971, reading his autobiography. 31 minutes in length.

Item 442:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 368, Side A. William Paul Sr., June 24, 1971, “Tlingit culture.” Recorded by Nora Florendo [Dauenhauer] and Rosita Rodriquez [Worl]. 30 minutes in length.

Item 443:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 368, Side B. William Paul Sr., June 24, 1971, “Tlingit culture.” Recorded by Nora Florendo [Dauenhauer] and Rosita Rodriquez [Worl]. 30 minutes in length.

Item 444:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 369, Side A. James Ward, Whitehorse, Sept. 5/6, 1972. 46 minutes in length. First 20 minutes are music, followed by informal conversational Tlingit and English.

Item 445:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 369, Side B. Tom Peters, Teslin, Sept. 8, 1972. Labeled “Tom Peters on visiting between interior and coast, Teikweidí and Deisheetaan, gaax’oo, Deisheetaan houses,” and contains Peters speaking and being interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer. 36 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. Content by DK: Nora and Tom speak, Tom speaks about his life, family, and clan, with words about at.óow, 0-7:18; Tom sings a short memorial song, 7:19-9:11; conversation about culture and language, mention of the effect of Christianity upon Tlingit culture and language, 9:12-17:32; Tom tells the story of how Raven Turned Black, 18:49-20:09; Tom tells a story about a man who trained and killed a giant octopus/sea monster, 20:10 to end of the recording. Notes on file.

Item 446:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 370, Side A. Lily White, May 16, 1994. 46 minutes in length. Speaking in English. Content; speaking about dance performance, protocol, Celebration, and culture.

Item 447:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 370, Side B. Lily White, May 16, 1994. 2 minutes in length.

Item 448:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 371, Side A. Ernesting Hanlon, Hoonah, Feb. 18, 1991. 46 minutes in length.

Item 449:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 373, Side A. Jim Young (Chookaneidi), Glacier Bay. 47 minutes in length. Speaking and singing in Tlingit. Audio quality is poor to fair. Content summary; Young talks about Tlingit history, migration history, place names, subsistence activities, and aspects of Tlingit culture. Content by DK: Young speaks on his grandchildren’s story, who were living at Shaa Shakee Aan, mention of Chookan Heeni, the Tlingit respect each other, introduction to a song, 0-5:19; Young sings a memorial song (Kaasteen X´asheeyí), likely a Chookaneidí song “It is not grievous to walk away from my land, …. To walk away from my precious son”, words about the song, 5:20-9:01; discussion of how the Tlingit used to use songs to respond to each other, 8:57-10:16; Young sings a song, likely a clan response memorial song, 10:19-12:56; Young speaks about the song and then begins to discuss the migration history of the Tlingit, the Kaagwaantaan settling at Xooknoowu, travel, the great flood, and Glacier Bay, Angoon, - to end of recording. Notes on file.

Item 450:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 374, Side A. Jim Young, Glacier Bay. 9 minutes in length.

Item 451:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 375, Side A. Lydia George (Deisheetaan) and Jimmy George (Killer Whale clan, Killer Whale house) of Angoon interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer, June 1, 1988, at Angoon. Length; 47:15. Speaking in Tlingit. Primary speaker on recording is Jimmy George. Content review by DK: Jimmy George tells the Origin of the Killer Whale story, Naatsilanei, 0-13:34, George then begins a song about a raving pulling the Salmon House to shore, but does not finish as Lydia George requests the Killer Whale song, 13:34-16:22; both Lydia and Jimmy discuss migration history, the flood, moving inland and to the tops of the mountains (with a Bentwood Box being carried), living near Teslin, then migration back to the coast, travel over and under a glacier and how one young man who went over the glacier got the name Sít´ká (on the glacier) to the Stikine [note on file about differing perspectives of this glacial migration history], followed by a Killer Whale song, 16:22-22:06; then another song about an unfortunate Killer Whale; which goes briefly “poor killer whale, poor killer whale, (look) what happened to you, (look) what happened to you.  Oh, that you were in your land, in your land (the place for the killer whale is in the water,” not all is sung, and is a memorial song, explanation provided, 22:06-24:32; then the Killer Whale Drum Song is sung, followed by a detailed explanation of these songs, and how they connect to the migration/travels of families that would become the Dakl’aweidí and Tsaagweidí (of Kake); 24:33-35:06; then Lydia mentions how her husband’s people sacrificed ten or twelve tínaa to obtain land back from the Tsaagweidí, she then goes on to tell about her family (Deisheetaan, Beaver/Raven) she mentions the mountain Shaadaa, Shaadaax´this is where they went during the great flood in order to save their children, states the Tlingit lived in the interior around the ten to fourteen thousand year ago period, then she asks Jimmy to complete the story/tell the Woochkaduhaa Story, about the spirit of the salmon, which he does, mention of the Salmon Spirit House, 35:07-42:31; then Jimmy sings two verses of the salmon spirit song, 42:31-44:22; then Jimmy tells of a powerful Killer Whale spiritual man, an íxt’, and how people harvested salmon in an area, how a feather and sand became a type of fish tag, 44:22-end of recording.

Item 452:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 375, Side B. Lydia George (Deisheetaan) and Jimmy George, Angoon, June 1, 1988. Length; 47:16. Speaking in Tlingit. Content by DK: Jimmy George continues speaking about Hood Bay and how the Killer Whale/Eagles obtained the land by payment from the Brown Bear clan, 0-0:59; Lydia George adds more detail about this property transfer and its significance, 0:59-1:28; Lydia talks about her community was conflicted about attending Celebration because a clan member had died, and it was not Tlingit tradition to dance if a koo.éex’ for the departed had not yet happened, concern expressed about dance groups being composed of both Eagles and Ravens, which is not traditional and outside the culture, 1:29-5:00; Lydia speaks about how much she enjoys Celebration, mention of a memorial for Ivan Gambell, 5:01-10:00; a lengthy discussion on the proper use and crediting of Tlingit songs, issues with intellectual properties of clan owned songs, 10:00-26:50; a letter is read and discussion about the Kake totem raising, loss of life on an airplane crash, mention of Angoon people, 26:51-41:25; discussion of Alaska Day, the Russian sale of Alaska to the U.S., but how the people of Angoon did not validate the sale of their lands, as no Russian or American asked Angoon about the sale of Angoon lands; 41:26 to end of recording.

Item 453:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 376, Side A. Recording labeled “Austin Hammond, translated by Rachel Johnson, March 1998, original source # 91.208.02.” Length; 29:41. Recording contains Hammond telling a story in Tlingit while Johnson translates in English. Recording opens with Hammond telling about the Flood at Seduction Point.

Item 454:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 377, Side 1. Johnny C. Jackson, Kake totem raising, Oct. 1971. Length; 40:38.

Item 455:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 377, Side 2. Johnny C. Jackson, Kake totem raising, Oct. 1971. Length; 26:09.

Item 456:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 378, Side A. Johnny C. Jackson, Kake stories, March 3, 1981, interviewed by Judson Brown. Length; 46:40.  Speaking in Tlingit. Content includes; the story and origins of the halibut hook; origin of hunting dogs; mention of the process of how people are named; explains why the Tlingit traditionally cremated their dead; and slight mention of his grandfather (Goonxaa Kuwakaan) and the history of Angoon.

Item 457:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 378, Side B. Johnny C. Jackson, Kake stories, March 3, 1981, interviewed by Judson Brown. Length; 46:42. Speaking in the Tlingit language. Content includes; discussion on the spiritual nature of Tlingit íxt’ (shamans), their spiritual preparations, and stories about íxt’, including one called to Klawock to aid in a war between the land otter people, another named Deikeenaa’o that helped the captured slaves be freed and returned to their families, and one about a wolf that ate a shaman and died; he then tells a story/oral tradition about an octopus that attacked a community, but was killed and became that community’s at.óow; then he begins to tell a story about a fight between a man and bear, the man had a knife, and they fought on a rock, but the tape ends before the story concludes.

Item 458:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 379, Side A. Attributed to Johnny C. Jackson, Kake stories, March 3, 1981, but the recording appears to have been recorded over by another. Length; 46:49. Speaking in English. Content; the bulk of the recording is blank, excluding small content of Lydia George speaking about her husband’s biography toward the end of the tape, but cut short when the tape ends.

Item 459:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 379, Side B. Johnny C. Jackson, Kake stories, March 3, 1981, interviewed by Judson Brown. Length; 46:01. Speaking in the Tlingit language. Content includes; detailed discussion on food harvests, preservation techniques, another, including salmon, halibut, potatoes, various types of clams, seaweed and other, includes mention of special oversized halibut hook for catching larger halibut; discussion on Tlingit trapping methods and animals trapped, including the red fox; discussion of traded foods, such as various berries obtained from select Tlingit communities, along with hooligan oil from Chilkat/Chilkoot territory; discussion on how meats like deer meet was stored and preserved in seal oil; mention of pre-contact potatoes (again); discussion of the role of maternal uncles in raising their nephews; discussion on the role of marriage, how wives were given by their fathers, and what occurred when a spouse died or was divorced; discussion on cooking deer meat on the mountain; concludes with discussion on the larger halibut hooks and a story about a woman who kept a halibut for a pet and how this connects to why Tlingit halibut fisherman yell out a particular phrase when boing to fish.

Item 460:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 380, Side 1. Johnny C. Jackson, Mt. Edgecumbe Hospital, August 10, 1993. Length; 9:41.

Item 461:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 382, Side A. Robert James Sr., Angoon, speaking about Alex Andrews, tape courtesy of Donelle Everson, November 23, 1992. Length; 13:24.

Item 462:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 383, Side 1. Jessie Dalton (T’akdeintaan), Hoonah, picnic, June 6, 1986. Length; 45:32. Speaking in Tlingit. Content includes; T’akdeintaan raven family song; basic conversation about her past, including her early time at the Sheldon Jackson school, working in a cannery as a youth, her mother’s maiden name being Star; and general discussion on marriages and arranged marriages.

Item 463:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 383, Side 2. Jessie Dalton (T’akdeintaan) and Richard Dalton, Hoonah, picnic, June 6, 1986. Length; 33:02. Conversational Tlingit about Dalton’s life history. Content by DK: Jessie speaks about travel and people, such as Dianne Nelson, mention of Tenakee Springs, 0-10:17; discussion on Tenakee Springs, mentions Skip Wallen, the ship Washington that burned, gumboots near Port. Anthrop; 10:17-17:38; further discussion about Nora’s mother’s grandfather, questions by Nora, George Dalton enters discussion, some discussion shifts to ANCSA and early players, dedication of the Sealaska Corporation plaza, to end of recording.

Item 464:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 384, Side A. Jessie Dalton, Mt. Edgecumbe Hospital, 1972. Length; 16:42.

Item 465:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 385, Side A. Recording labeled “Martin Dennis,” but contains a recording of a woman being interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer, at Juneau, October 1, 1972. Length; 46:38. Speaking and singing in Tlingit. Content review by DK: recording begins amid a song being sung by Nora about Glacier Bay, then a memorial song is sung by Nora about people leaving Glacier Bay village because of the glacier’s advance, a Chookaneidi family – bear/eagle family song of Hoonah, another song is sung, no explanation given, followed by another song, no explanation, possibly a spiritual chant, then another song begins, this song a love song about the raven children of the Kaagwaantaan, 0-13:19; then words from an unidentified woman about how the Kaagwaantaan got the Killer Whale Clan Hat, how the Killer Whale family and Chookaneidi family were involved, and how the hat came to be Kaagwaantaan, 13:19-18:15; discussion shifts to talk about trading with interior tribes, such as the Tagish, how they intermarried with the Tlingit, how this affect moiety, 18:15-21:21; then a story is told about a family that obtained wealth, first how a man helped a struggling frog escape from a sandy pit, and how wealth came to the family in the end, 21:22-41:00; then Nora asks this woman about the women who went under the glacier, with general discussion about them, their song, and other, 41:01-46:38. Songs in this recording concern the Chookaneidi, stories the Lukaax.ádi and Killer Whale clans.

Item 466:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 385, Side B. Recording labeled “Martin Dennis,” but contains a recording of a woman being interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer, at Juneau, October 1, 1972. Johnny Marks may also have been present at this interview. Length; 46:38. Speaking in Tlingit. Content review by DK: recording begins in the middle of a discussion about a Chilkat robe being cared for by Austin Hammond, then the woman tells the story of Raven Flying into the Whale, 0-23:51; two songs are then partially sang [recording quality is poor, making it difficult to hear], 23:51-29:36; then the story of the Box of Daylight is told, 29:36-36:36; then tells the story of when Ravel Stole the Water, 36:37-40:36;, followed by discussion of raven stories, the woman admits in her old age she is not able to recall all the stories she once knew, 40:37 to end of recording.

Item 467:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 386, Side A. Jenny Thlunaut being interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer and Johnnie Marks, Klukwan, October 25, 1973. Length; 45:32.  Speaking in Tlingit and English – 50/50. The recording is a one day visit with Jennie Thlunaut by Nora Marks Dauenhauer and Johnnie Marks and they have light conversation about weaving and beading. Visitors come to Jennie’s house throughout the recording. Conversational Tlingit and English.

Item 468:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 387, Side 1. Bert Dennis memorial, Haines ANB Hall, October 5, 1974. Length; 45:16.

Item 469:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 387, Side 2. Bert Dennis memorial, Haines ANB Hall, October 5, 1974. Length; 47:07.

Item 470:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 388, Side 1. J.B. Fawcett, “recorded at Marks Trail, Juneau, by Nora Florendo Dauenhauer,” 1969. Length; 29:05. Singing and speaking in Tlingit. Content summary; this recording appears to capture words and song at a koo.éex’, perhaps held in Hoonah or for a Hoonah Chookaneidi-Eagle Brown Bear Clan individual. Speaking about clan history, the flood, places, migration history, and songs. Notes on file from FW review.

Item 471:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 388, Side 2. J.B. Fawcett, “recorded at Marks Trail, Juneau, by Nora Florendo Dauenhauer,” 1969. Length; 14:43. Singing and speaking in Tlingit.

Item 472:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 389, Side 1. J.B. Fawcett, “recorded at Marks Trail, Juneau, by Nora Florendo Dauenhauer,” 1969. Length; 31:22. Singing and speaking in Tlingit.

Item 473:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 389, Side 2. J.B. Fawcett, “recorded at Marks Trail, Juneau, by Nora Florendo Dauenhauer,” 1969. Length; 29:25.  Singing and speaking in Tlingit.

Item 474:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 391, Side A. Alfred Andrews, Jimmy Marks, and Jack David, undated. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 28:42. Singing and speaking in Tlingit.

Item 475:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 391, Side B. Alfred Andrews, Jimmy Marks, and Jack David, undated. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 27:09.

Item 476:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 392, Side A. Audio recording of “Mrs. Davis,” June 23, 1973. Original recording on aluminum cylinder by Carol B. Davis. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 30:24.

Item 477:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 392, Side B. Audio recording of “Mrs. Davis,” June 23, 1973. Original recording on aluminum cylinder by Carol B. Davis. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 18:20.

Item 478:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 393, Side 1. Audio recording of Jim Fox, June 1973. Original recording on aluminum cylinder by Carol B. Davis. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 45:35. Singing and speaking in Tlingit.

Item 479:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 393, Side 2. Audio recording of Jim Fox, June 1973. Original recording on aluminum cylinder by Carol B. Davis. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 31:39.

Item 480:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 394, Side 1. Audio recording of singing and dancing, June 27, 1973. Includes the Halibut Dance, Ptarmigan Dance, Gunanaa Dance, and Halibut Spirit Dance. Original recording on aluminum cylinder by Carol B. Davis. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 30:57.

Item 481:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 394, Side 2. Audio recording of singing and dancing, June 27, 1973. Includes the Halibut Dance, Ptarmigan Dance, Gunanaa Dance, and Halibut Spirit Dance. Original recording on aluminum cylinder by Carol B. Davis. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 29:34.

Item 482:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 395, Side A. Harriman expedition recordings of Tlingit at Sitka from 1899, Tlingit oratory and songs, possibly Kaagwaantaan and other clans. Number EC 10 501 of # 83-908F (6038A, 6039A). Copy of original recordings on wax cylinders, originals held by the National Museum of the American Indian, New York. Length; 7:20, sound quality fair to poor. Portion of two speeches from recordings were published in Dauenhauer book HTY.

Item 483:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 396, Side A. Audio recording of a “song for Dick and Nora [Dauenhauer] from Peter Kalifornsky, undated. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 10:21.

Item 484:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 397, Side A. Bertha Trifon, Feb. 13, 1978. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 15:00.

Item 485:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 398, Side A. Russian Old Believers singing, Maria Mametiev, Gervaisi, Oregon, originally recorded by Suzy Jones, July 20, 1979. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 30:04.

Item 486:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 398, Side B. Russian Old Believers singing, Maria Mametiev, Gervaisi, Oregon, originally recorded by Suzy Jones, July 20, 1979. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 30:05.

Item 487:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 399. Russian Old Believers singing, Maria Mametiev, Gervaisi, Oregon, originally recorded by Suzy Jones, July 20, 1979. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 19:05.

Item 488:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 400, Side 1. Recording of a Carcross Potlatch, Austin Hammond and Jenny, undated. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 46:21.

Item 489:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 400, Side 2. Recording of a Carcross Potlatch, Austin Hammond and Jenny, undated. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 10:01.

Item 490:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 401, Side 1. Recording of a “Shark House Practice,” Oct. 13, 1976. Speakers include David Kadashan, Elise Pratt, Nora Dauenhauer, Florence Sheakley, Lillian, Ida Kadashan, and William Johnson. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 46:21.

Item 491:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 401, Side 2. Recording of a “Shark House Practice,” Oct. 13, 1976. Speakers include David Kadashan, Elise Pratt, Nora Dauenhauer, Florence Sheakley, Lillian, Ida Kadashan, and William Johnson. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 30:48.

Item 492:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 403, Side A. Recording of Jimmy Johnson and Robert Zuboff, labeled “tape from Angoon,” undated. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 46:47.  Speaking in Tlingit. Content review by DK: unidentified man tells the history of the 1882 Bombardment of Angoon, provides much detailed information, 0-10:01; this speaker then tells how the Gaanaxteidi and the Deisheetaan separated, in part because of a marital affair of a wife, and how some moved to Klukwan, 10:02-16:44; overview of the Raven House, Beaver House, and Raven Nest House, 16:45-20:46; story of the Great Flood and migration history, structures on the tops of the mountains as homes, 20:48-28:44; then the story about the Raven Yookhis´khookeikh is told, 29:47-40-57; discussion on Yanxoon Hít, a L’eeneidí house, then mention of the other clan houses, then the Teikweidí Bear House, and then various other clan’s houses, including the Deisheetaan and Wooshkeetaan, 41:27-46:40.

Item 493:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 403, Side B. Recording of Jimmy Johnson and Robert Zuboff speaking in Tlingit, undated. Migrated from cassette to CD. Length; 24:09. Content includes Zuboff speaking about the ancient habitation of the Tlingit in Southeast Alaska, stories of early life, and then he moves into telling the story of Basket Bay and the beaver. Angoon clan houses are mentioned, some discussed, including the story about Kaakw Hít, Kaakw Hít and Goox Hít.

Item 494:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 404, Side A. Copy of Tape 403 Side B. Length; 24:31. Recording inaccurately labeled “interviews with Chilkat weavers.” Migrated from cassette to CD. [Note: these and the following recordings start up to 20 seconds earlier than some other copies, adding a sentence or two to content.]

Item 495:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 404, Side B. Copy of Tape 403 Side A. Length; 47:03.  Recording inaccurately labeled “interviews with Chilkat weavers.” Migrated from cassette to CD.

Item 496:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 405, Side A. Copy of Tape 403 Side B. Length; 46:52. Recording inaccurately labeled “interviews with Chilkat weavers.” Migrated from cassette to CD.

Item 497:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 405, Side B. Copy of Tape 403 Side A. Length 24:03. Recording inaccurately labeled “interviews with Chilkat weavers.” Migrated from cassette to CD.

Item 498:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 406, Side A. Recording of what is most likely a Chookaneidí family koo.éex´ in Hoonah, Alaska; Recording is mislabeled as being “interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985.”  . Migrated from cassette to CD. Contains singing and speaking in Tlingit, including Tlingit oratory and conversational speaking. Audibility fluctuates from poor to fair.

Item 499:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 406, Side B. Recording of what is most likely a Chookaneidí family koo.éex’ in Hoonah, Alaska; Recording is mislabeled as being “interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985.”  Migrated from cassette to CD. Contains singing and speaking in Tlingit, including Tlingit oratory and conversational speaking. Audibility fluctuates from poor to fair.

Item 500:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 407, Side A. Recording of what is most likely a Chookaneidí family koo.éex’ in Hoonah, Alaska. In attendance were the T’akdeintaan, the Lukaax.ádi, the L’uknax.ádi and the Deisheetaan people. Recording is mislabeled as being “interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985.” Contains singing and speaking in Tlingit, including Tlingit oratory and conversational speaking. Audibility fluctuates from poor to fair. Many individuals are present and speak, including Austin Hammond, Johnny Marks, and Charlie Joseph. See notes in file.

Item 501:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 407, Side B. Recording of what is most likely a Chookaneidí family koo.éex’ in Hoonah, Alaska. In attendance were the T’akdeintaan, the Lukaax.ádi, the L’uknax.ádi and the Deisheetaan people. Recording is mislabeled as being “interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985.” Contains singing and speaking in Tlingit, including Tlingit oratory and conversational speaking. Audibility fluctuates from poor to fair. Audibility fluctuates from poor to fair. Continued from previous. Includes content on Hoonah’s history and culture.

Item 502:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 408, Side A. Recording of what is most likely a Chookaneidí family koo.éex’ in Hoonah, Alaska; Recording is mislabeled as being “interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985.” Migrated from cassette to CD.

Item 503:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 409, Side A. Recording of what may have been a koo.éex’ for Joseph A. White (Koowanagaas) of the Shangukeidí of Klukwan and Yakutat, since he was spoken of as a focus, and the recording is mislabeled as “interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985.” Migrated from cassette to CD. In 2012 a fluent speaks of this recording stated “For music this is one of the most powerful recordings anyone can listen to if they want to learn how the songs were sung by this generation of people who sang these songs/chants.  It is the best!” Notes on file about recording content. Contains singing and speaking in Tlingit. Audibility is fair.

Item 504:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 410, Side A. Recording of a koo.éex’, with mostly Lukaax.ádi people speaking, recording is mislabeled as “interviews with Chilkat weavers”. Migrated from cassette to CD. Contains singing and speaking in Tlingit, primarily by “Johnny.” Audibility is fair. Notes on file.

Item 505:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 410, Side B. Recording of a koo.éex’, with mostly Lukaax.ádi people speaking, recording is mislabeled as “interviews with Chilkat weavers”. Migrated from cassette to CD. Contains singing and speaking in Tlingit, primarily by “Johnny.” Audibility is fair. Notes on file.

Item 506:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 411, Side A. Recording of “interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985.” Migrated from cassette to CD. 30:57 minutes in length. Content: speaking in English between an older weaver and a younger weaver.

Item 507:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 411, Side B. Recording of “interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985.” Migrated from cassette to CD. 27:27 minutes in length. Content: speaking in English between an older weaver and a younger weaver.

Item 508:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 412, Side A. Recording about Sockeye/Raven objects of cultural patrimony. Primarily Lukaax.ádi people speaking about their history, songs, and especially their at.óowu. Recording is mislabeled as being “interviews with Chilkat weavers.” Migrated from cassette to CD. 30:41 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit, ability fluctuates from poor to fair. At.óowu items mentioned include; Shaa Daa S’aax´w, Naatooxch´áyee, Xaakw x´. Austin Hammond speaks on this recording.

Item 509:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 412, Side B. Recording is a continuation of previous, primarily Nora Marks Dauenhauer interviewing people about clan at.óowu. Migrated from cassette to CD. Speaking in mostly in Tlingit, approximately 60%, with the remaining in English. 31 minutes in length. Audio quality is poor. Content review by DK: an unidentified woman speaks about how Austin Hammond began caring for a Lukaax.ádi Sun Tínaa, but the tínaa was not of Hammond’s clan, Hammond was a grandchild of that clan. Hammond did a good job, but the clan could not obtain the tínaa back from Hammond, they were pained by this, so the family made another. The speaker then discusses how she lost a child (that appears to have died), she weeps on the recording, and speaks about this relation to the Sun Tínaa, 0-9:19; [audio quality deteriorates hereafter] a general quietness falls on those present after speaking about the loss of the tínaa and the child, but then some discuss a memorial service in Angoon and events; 9:21-21:39; then a man (possibly Joseph A. White) stands and introduces a Shangukeidí song, a song used to dedicate the Thunderbird House in Klukwan in 1972 (this man mentions that his wife was a L’uknax.ádi from Hoonah, and she was a daughter of a Kaagwaantaan father), then the song/chant is sung, entitled Daat ghaa sakwshé kooxdei kooxtátées´nooch, 21:39-23:11; then another song/chant is begun, sung by various families, called goosú wá.é; to end of recording.

Item 510:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 413, Side A. Recording of interviews with “Chilkat weavers, 1985.” Migrated from cassette to CD. 15 minutes in length. Primary speaker on the recording is Jenny Thlunaut. Speaking in Tlingit.

Item 511:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 414, Side A. Recording of interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985. Migrated from cassette to CD. Speaking in Tlingit and English. 32 minutes in length. Primary speaker on the recording is Jenny Thlunaut, but also included is Austin Hammond and Nora Marks Dauenhauer. This was a workshop held with funds contributed by Judson Brown. During the first 7 minutes Jenny Thlunaut speaks about the following; Tells about how she learned to weave.  Tells of her parents support.  She tells about how time consuming it is.  She says that the sale price of the Chilkat Robe was $50.  She said that she was told to save the money. She said that money had  a spirit and that it loved to be taken care of very carefully.  She said that sometimes she would keep the money before she spent any of her earnings.  This is why she was never poor.  She talks about her first $50.  She was paid with two $20 gold pieces and one $10.00 piece.  He father instructed her not to spend the money but to save it.  She was taught this. She also talked about how her faith was established by her parents.  She said that she would go to church on Sundays and on Wednesdays.  She was taught to thank God for the talent that she was given as a person.  She did not take it for granted.  Then she mentioned how her peers did not seem to take too much interest in the type of art she was learning.  She references them just running around and says I don’t know why I was not like that.  Maybe it is because I was taught differently.  She then mentions how she prays that someone else would pick up the art of weaving. She then mentions who her father’s people were and where they were from.  Gaanaxteidí, Whale/Raven people were her father’s people.  She mentioned earlier that her mother was from Sitka but that she was married to a man in Klukwan, Alaska that is why she was born in Klukwan, Alaska. She says she could not forget the name of a Tsimshian woman whose name was Haayoowaash Tláa.  This is the person who taught the weaving of the Chilkat robes.  She said that they took it apart and learned how to weave this blanket.  She said that a person named Martha Willard has that blanket. Once they learned how to make this, it was her father’s sisters (Gaanaxteidí women) that knew how to weave first and they were the ones who taught her how to weave.  They wove a blanket and it was the first one and this is how it became known as the Chilkat blanket to this very day.  These blankets were not made in Sitka, Hoonah, or any other place but Klukwan, Alaska that is why it is named Chilkat Blanket she says.  She then says she does not know why the Tsimshian lost this art but she is happy that there are those who want to continue the art.”  See notes on file.

Item 512:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 414, Side B. Recording continued from previous. Migrated from cassette to CD. Speaking in Tlingit and English.

Item 513:            Oral Literature Collection, Tape 415, Side A. Recording of interviews with Chilkat weavers, 1985. Migrated from cassette to CD.



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