Log In | Contact Us| View Cart (0)
Browse: Collections Digital Content Subjects Creators Record Groups

Dauenhauer Tlingit Oral Literature Collection

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

Items 1-73, Tapes 1-60.

Items 74-154, Tapes 61-128.

Items 155-235, Tapes 129-189.

Items 236-315, Tapes 190-259.

Items 316-415, Tapes 260-348.

Items 416-513, Tapes 348-415.

Items 514-  , Tapes 423-

Duplicate copies of CDs from the collection, originally used for the 2011-2013 IMLS Enhancement Grant review process, but saved as a second copy.

Documents concerning the review of these recordings via a 2011-2013 IMLS Enhancement Grant.



Contact us about this collection

Dauenhauer Tlingit Oral Literature Collection, 1899-1999 | Sealaska Heritage Institute Archives

By Zachary R. Jones, Archivist

Printer-friendly Printer-friendly | Email Us Contact Us About This Collection

Collection Overview

Title: Dauenhauer Tlingit Oral Literature Collection, 1899-1999Add to your cart.

ID: MC/005

Primary Creator: Dauenhauer, Nora Marks (1927-)

Other Creators: Dauenhauer, Richard L. (1942-2014)

Extent: 9.0 Boxes

Date Acquired: 11/13/2012

Subjects: Tlingit Indians--History., Tlingit language.

Languages: English, Tlingit

Scope and Contents of the Materials

This collection contains approximately 500 audio recordings on CD, which were collected or created by scholars Nora Marks Dauenhauer and Richard Dauenhauer. These recordings date from 1899 to 1999, contain speaking in English and Tlingit (the bulk in Tlingit), and document a vast array of subjects and topics concerning Tlingit history, culture, subsistence, land issues, language  and other aspects of importance relative to the Tlingit. The recordings capture the words of Tlingit elders, orators, activists, cultural specialists, and others, as well as the audio from various conferences, Tlingit gatherings and events, and other cultural programs. These recordings are very rich with content and contain important information about the Tlingit people.

The CDs that comprise this collection were obtained from the Dauenhauers, after University of Alaska Southeast staff migrated these recordings to CD format per grant funding. The Dauenhauers retain the original format recordings (reels, cassettes, etc.). The CDs contained a numbering system kept by the Dauenhauers, found on these CDs upon donation to SHI, and SHI archival staff has retained this numbering system, which is reflected in the inventory. Descriptive information about the content of the recordings, which are labeled on individual CDs, has also been retained. When requesting a recording from this collection, please include the Item number and the Tape number to assist staff in locating the recording.

From 2011 to 2013 via an IMLS Enhancement Grant, recordings in this collection with limited to no descriptive information were reviewed by fluent Tlingit speakers, who provided detailed feedback. Item descriptions were updated from this feedback, providing a better documentation of this collection for the public. These fluent speaking reviewers primarily included David Katzeek (Shangukeidí Clan) of Klukwan, Fred White (Shangukeidí Clan) of Yakutat, and Marsha Hotch (Gaanaxteidí Clan) of Klukwan. The final box in the collection contains documents from some their reviews, which can greatly assist researchers in understanding additional details of the recordings.

In 2012 SHI received a document from the Dauenhauers that detailed the contents of part of the collection, with recordings description primarily from Nora Marks Dauenhauer. Description by Nora has been noted as ‘content by NMD’.

Biographical Note

Nora Marks Dauenhauer (b. 1927) is an American poet, short-story writer, and a scholar of the language and traditions of the Tlingit Indians of Southeast Alaska. Nora Marks herself is Tlingit, and was born May 8, 1927, the first of sixteen children of Emma Marks (1913-2006) of Yakutat, Alaska, and Willie Marks (1902-1981), a Tlingit from near Juneau, Alaska. Nora's Tlingit name at birth was Keixwnéi, and following her mother in the Tlingit matrilineal system, she is a member of the Raven moiety, L’ukaax.ádi clan, and of the Shaka Hít or Canoe Prow House, from Alsek River. Emma's maternal grandfather had been Frank Italio (1870-1956), an informant to the anthropologist Frederica de Laguna whose knowledge was incorporated into De Laguna's 1972 ethnography of the northern Tlingit, Under Mount St. Elias. In circa 1972 Nora was selected and endorsed by Tlingit elders to document the Tlingit culture, and since that time Nora collected recordings and interviewed Tlingit elders. Nora earned a degree in anthropology and, with her husband Richard Dauenhauer, a poet and translator, she has authored numerous articles and also co-edited the Sealaska Heritage Institute's highly regarded four volume Classics of Tlingit Oral Literature series, titles which includes, Haa Shuká, Our Ancestors: Tlingit Oral Narratives (1987), Haa Tuwanáagu Yís, for Healing Our Spirit: Tlingit Oratory (1992), Haa Kusteeyí, Our Culture: Tlingit Life Stories. (1994), and Anóoshi Lingít Aaní Ká: Russians in Tlingit America, The Battles of Sitka 1802 and 1804 (2009).

Subject/Index Terms

Tlingit Indians--History.
Tlingit language.

Administrative Information

Repository: Sealaska Heritage Institute Archives

Use Restrictions: Intellectual Properties Note: Since SHI adheres to the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials, and since we desire to honor Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian traditional cultural belief that clans retain the intellectual property rights to clan stories or songs, patrons who use or study clan songs or stories are asked to credit clan ownership to stories and songs.

Acquisition Source: Nora Marks Dauenhauer

Acquisition Method: The materials in this collection were received by SHI in various batches between 2008 and 2012 from Richard L. Dauenhauer and Nora Marks Dauenhauer. They signed an official deed of gift on Nov. 13, 2012. Regarding specific accessions, Items 1-314 (Tapes 1-258) were received on November 15, 2008, Items 315-335 (Tapes 258-280) on November 4, 2009, Items 336-350 (Tapes 292-299) on August 20, 2010, Items 336-384 (Tapes 300-340) on November 3, 2010, Items 385-526 (Tapes 341-430) on January 30, 2012.

Preferred Citation: MC 5, Item #, Tape #, Dauenhauer Tlingit Oral Literature Collection, Sealaska Heritage Institute Archives, Juneau, Alaska

Processing Information: Processed by: Rick Huteson, Archival Assistant, & Zachary Jones, Archivist


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Box:

[Box 1: Items 1-73, Tapes 1-60.],
[Box 2: Items 74-154, Tapes 61-128.],
[Box 3: Items 155-235, Tapes 129-189.],
[Box 4: Items 236-315, Tapes 190-259.],
[Box 5: Items 316-415, Tapes 260-348.],
[Box 6: Items 416-513, Tapes 348-415.],
[Box 7: Items 514-  , Tapes 423-],
[Box 8: Duplicate copies of CDs from the collection, originally used for the 2011-2013 IMLS Enhancement Grant review process, but saved as a second copy.],
[Box 9: Documents concerning the review of these recordings via a 2011-2013 IMLS Enhancement Grant.],
[All]

Box 1: Items 1-73, Tapes 1-60.Add to your cart.

Item 1:                  Oral Literature Collection; Tape 1-2. Tape one: Robert Zuboff (Kak’weidí Clan, Kaakáakw Hít), Mosquito, 1974, as published in Haa Shuka. CD track 1. Tape 2: Frank Johnson, Strong man, published in Haa Shuka. CD track 2.

Item 2:                  Oral Literature Collection; Tape 3:  Recording of Frank Dick Sr. (Naakilaan; of the Raven Coho Clan, Far Out House) and Jennie White Dick (Jeinik, of the Eagle Thunderbird Clan, Thunderbird House), recorded 2-11-78, speaking is entirely in Tlingit. Interviewer is Nora Dauenhauer. 22:18 minutes in length. Content includes; a) Frank Dick Sr. talking about Clan House locations in the Dry Bay and the Alsek River area and the Aakwe River and the Clan houses on the of Guséixh on the Aakwe River; b) Genealogy of Nora Dauenhauer’s family and Shamans of the areas; and c) a short Raven story about King salmon. Recording concerns the people of Yakutat and Dry Bay, the Lukaax.ádi Clan, and clans of the speakers.

Item 3:                  Oral Literature Collection; Tape 4:  Recording of Frank Dick, recorded 2-11-78, speaking is entirely in Tlingit. Interviewer appears to be Nora Dauenhauer. 23:02 minutes in length. Continued from Tape 3. Content: a) Discussion of place names in Dry Bay Alsek river area of the north Gulf coast of Southeast Alaska, b) Short discussion of Raven story when Raven beached the Whale on Bear Island in Dry Bay, c) Discussion of (Lukaax.ádi) Raven Sockeye Clan genealogy, Clan Shaman names in Dry Bay Alsek river area. [Migrated from a broken cassette; there are 1 or more short gaps where a splice was made or the Tape would not play.]

Item 4:                  Oral Literature Collection; Tape 5:  Robert Zuboff (Kak’weidí Clan, Kaakáakw Hít), Tlingit speaking, from reel to reel 1. Notes say “Undated but probably recorded by O.W. Frost at APU during the 1972-73 academic year.” 31:45 minutes in length. First 29 minutes is entirely in Tlingit, last two minutes in English. English speaks about a story connecting coastal Tlingit to the inland Tlingit at Teslin, Yukon. Tlingit speaking includes Zuboff telling Raven stories. English translation provided on Tape 6 [next tape].

Item 5: Oral Literature Collection; Tape 6: Robert Zuboff, English speaking, from reel to reel 1. Notes say “Undated, probably recorded by O.W. Frost at APU during 1972-73 academic year.” Speaking in English. 59 minutes in length. Content is continued from Tape 5; an English version from Tlingit stories told on Tape 5. Raven stories; the raven chased down from heaven, and salmon runs. How the tide master brought the flood.

Item 6:                  Oral Literature Collection; Tape 7:  Recording labeled “Esther Johnson,” from reel to reel; songs from Yakutat. Recorded by John Marks October 1968, Hoonah. Inside label on masking Tape, “A Story. Last Portion Slower”. Recording contains speaking/introduction by John Marks and then singing by Marks and Esther Johnson; all in the Tlingit language. 29 minutes in length.

Item 7: Oral Literature Collection; Tape 8, Side A-B.  Recording primarily of Olaf Abraham speaking, but also words by Maggie Adams and Paul Henry, undated, recorded at Yakutat. Content includes; a Olaf Abraham talks about the Eagle Brown Bear clan migration from Ketchikan area up the coast of Southeast Alaska; b) Clan settling in Anklin River area of Yakutat Alaska; c) Rescue story of Golden Eagle and acquiring it as the Screen of the Teikweidí Clan in Yakutat; d) song for the screen of Golden Eagle; e) Olaf Abraham’s personal mourning song for his people of Anklin River; f) Maggie Adams sings her uncle’s mourning song; g) Maggie Adams sings Copper River songs; h) Paul Henry sends personal message to the people of Yakutat; i) Paul Henry records potlatch at Teslin BC where his wife worked as a teacher; and j) song in Athabaskan continue at potlatch in Teslin. Two CDs, CD 1: 65 minutes in length, CD 2: 58 minutes long. Speaking and singing entirely in Tlingit on CD 1, some English speaking on CD 2. Contains speaking and singing. Content on this recording primary concerns Yakutat and the Teikweidí Clan, Drum House.

Item 8:                  Oral Literature Collection; Tape 9 Side A. Henry Denny speaking, Saxman, December 10, 1970. Label on original reel reeds; “Recorded especially for Nora Florendo for learning Alaska Indian History”  “1&2 Sides is the history of the Sanyaa Kwáan known as the Cape Fox Tribe, as told by Alaska Indian Chief Kashakes n. 4, Henry Denny”.

Item 9:                  Oral Literature Collection; Tape 9 Side B. Henry Denny, Saxman, December 10, 1970. Label on original reel reeds;  “Recorded especially for Nora Florendo for learning Alaska Indian History”  “1&2 Side is the history of the Sanyaa Kwáan known as the Cape Fox Tribe, as told by Alaska Indian Chief Kashakes n 4, Henry Denny.”

Item 10:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 10:  Jimmy Marks (#2), “End of crying.” Original Tape recorder may have slowed down during recording, speaking in Tlingit only. Audio quality poor. 2:39 minutes in length (short clip).

Item 11a:            Oral Literature Collection; Tape 11 Side 1. Audio recording primarily concerning Jenny Marks, but appears to be multiple male (including Johnny Marks and perhaps Horace Marks) interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer; Interview/storytelling all in Tlingit. CD 1: 44:42 minutes in length. Content review by DK: Jenny speaks about her brother’s name Gúnanaaxdújí and its history, 0-10:15; Jenny sings an íxt’ song, and speaks about its nature; 10:15-12:17; discussion between Jenny, Nora, and another man (Horace Marks?) about the íxt’ song Naatooxshayee, 12:17-13:58; discussion about various íxt’ and their spiritual nature, including an íxt’ named Yaxyaandus.ax, and an íxt’ whose head (which had been cut off) walked up the beach and back to his community, 13:59-24:07; a discussion on the sensitive nature of how some individuals in the Tlingit community sold at.óowu, including a mosquito mask, 24:07-33:40; discussion of a song concerning Tl’oon Tlaa, then singing of a T´ákdeintaaní yátx´ee, about the Eagle children of the T’akdeintaan family; 33:41-35:57; general conversation about family, 35:57-40:49; Jenny begins a song about the Kaagwaantaan yatx’ee, Raven children of the Kaagwaantaan and Chookaneidi, 40:49-42:12.

Item 11b:            Oral Literature Collection; Tape 11 Side 2. Audio recording primarily concerning Jenny Marks, but appears to be multiple male (including Johnny Marks and perhaps Horace Marks) interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer; Interview all in Tlingit. CD 1: CD 2 44 minutes in length. Disc 2: Content review by DK: recording begins amid a song by Jenny, followed by another about a woman named Kaalxaal.ach, then sings a Coho/Raven song, which Jenny articulates as being an ancient song, composed during the period of Kaax’aachgóok, 0-3:01; Jenny then sings the first verse of a love song, about an island that disappeared, a song for the Lukaax.ádi, Sockeye/Raven children, and discussion about this song, 3:01-5:39; discussion about Chinook [Tsimshian] songs, then Jenny begins singing a Chinook Kwáan x´ásheeyí song, but is interrupted before she can complete the song, 5:41-8:28; another Tsimshian song is sung, then the discussion speaks about a historic photograph taken by Winter & Pond of a woman indicated by W&P as being Tlingit and dressed as an íxt’, with a horn headdress and Chilkat robe in the picture, but was actually a Tsimshian, and this song sung in Tsimshian was sung by the Tsimshian to her; 8:50-12:46; discussion about Mary Klanott-Kasko, one more Tsimshian song is sung, the general conversation ensues, some about the Wooshkeetaan Sun House taking Chookaneidí at.óowu, then jokes are told over dinner, 12:46-44:34.

Item 12:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 12 Side A. Recording labeled “Tom Peters and Bert Dennis. Side A. 1. Tom Peters, Teslin Yukon, September 8, 1972. 2. Bert Dennis, Haines, AK, September 11, 1972.” 46 minutes in length. Speaking and singing primarily in Tlingit. Content by DK: Tom Peters tells the story of the Woman Who Married the Bear, 0-20:34, Peters then sings the song associated with the story, 20:34-21:26; Peters then goes on to speak about Tlingit marriage practices, some in the English language, 21:26-27:59; Bert Dennis begins speaking, talks on various subjects, migration history, and towards the end he speaks about place names around the Juneau-Douglas area, 27:59-46:23.

Item 13:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 12 Side B.  Side B. Bert Dennis, Haines, AK, September 11, 1972.  46 minutes in length. Speaking entirely in Tlingit and English. Audio quality is poor to fair. Content by DK: Dennis speaks about how Chilkoot land became the property of Lukaax.ádi; 0-9:48; he then tells how the Lukaax.ádi got their name, 9:48-12:44; Dennis then speaks about a number of subjects in Tlingit and English, including migration of the Lukaax.ádi through Glacier Bay to the Chilkat/Chilkoot area, effects of alcohol on the Tlingit, then questions on the origin and meaning of the name Daanawáak, 12:44- to end of recording.

Item 14:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 13.  Willie Marks January 2, 1979 (Juneau). Naatsilanei [Origins of the Killer Whale], Duktootl [Strong Man].

Item 15:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 14.  Emma Marks, Juneau Celebration Speech, 1982 (published in HTY).

Item 16:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 15.  Emma Marks, Yakutat, May 18, 1997.  Raven Story; recorded by NPS. 1) Yakw deiyi; 2) Yail nees akawlishaa; 3) Ravens birth and flood.  (All transcribed as of 2000)  Cover note from Wayne Howell with Tape; 1-21-98, discussion the poor quality of the recording in some places.

Item 17:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 16.  Recording labeled “SNEP Raven Stories. Copy from Sitka Native Education Program received 4-4-95, Charlie Joseph, Salmon Box George Davis (?), Raven and the Whale.” 54 minutes in length. Storytelling in Tlingit. Content by DK: speaker [George Davis ?] begins talking about the harvesting of eulachon, then the curiosity of the Raven, and Raven’s interaction with eulachon, 0-8:51; telling of the story of Raven Flying Down into the Whale, Yaay yikdei wdikeeni yeil, 8:51-16:50; Charlie Joseph begins speaking, tells the Box of Daylight story, 16:50-25:00; followed by the story of how Raven created man, with discussion about Raven stories, 25:00-48:49; Charlies speaks more about Raven, tells a story about the land otter people who hosted a koo.éex’ and invited the Raven, and how Raven taught people to dance, followed by the song the Raven sang, 48:52-54:32.

Item 18:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 17 Side A.  Susie James (Kaaxsgeiy), Sitka May 14, 1972.  Label has ”File NO. SJ 02”. Content; Content note by NMD: Shaxoo, a Chookaneidí shaman, lived on a little island near Hoonah with his son. The tide came up over their house, they stayed safe. How Shaxoo was called to attend to sick person. Story of Xakúch', a Chookaneidí man and a giant Devil fish (octopus).  T'akdeintaan story, Shatukwaan keidli - Mt. Fairweather people's dog, story of the man who led the dog to the mountain.  Susie tells of X'eijáakw' and Shkík two shaman who received a shaman spirit. (mk 0:18:00) Naas Shaak Aankáawu is about Raven and the Sun Mask (How Raven stole the Stars, Moon, and Sun? or Box of Daylight). Kageet Kuyéik…? (mk 0:30:00) Raven and the Water. (mk 0:33:30) Raven and Ganookw (owner of the water?). Raven and Ganookw argue about their age.  Gaanaxáa is a place where gulls or terns go to rest/nest. "I'd really like to see that." - NMD "She's a lot of fun (Nora talking about Susie)" - NMD  'Susie was so happy to tell stories in Tlingit, her family only spoke english. Only her daughter spoke Tlingit." - NMD. They try to define words. (mk 0:40:13) Raven and Tide Woman. (mk 0:45:00) Raven and Potlatch (inviting Devil fish?). (mk 0:48:30) Raven and Killer Whale. (mk 0:52:00) Raven and Salmon Box(?). Near the end of the session, the recording sounds fast.  Maybe from a worn cassette?  "Susie is a fast talker" - NMD "Susie was full of songs" - NMD. Mary Peleyo is present.

Item 19:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 17 Side B. Jessie Wilson Burial Party, Amy Marvin opening, undated. Speaking entirely in the Tlingit language, recording of public event; includes speaking, oratory, and signing. Audio quality fades from good to poor. 59 minutes in length. Content: Opening by Amy Marvin. Harry Marvin, Amy's husband also gives speech. Amy sings songs, other women join in.  Susie James from Taku is present and sings too.  Other unknown woman sings as well.  Marks Trail sings song from Hoonah.  Jessie Wilson adopted Emma Marks as her daughter.  After this song, the speeches seem to be over and all that is left is random conversation.

Item 20:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 18 Side A. Recording attributed to Susie James, Sitka, June 7, 1973 (Tlingit & Haida meeting June 1973?). Conversational speaking in the Tlingit language. 45 minutes in length. Content by NMD: She's doing someone's genealogy, don't know who. She's talking about Raven walking along the beach. Nagoodik'i - A story of a man walking over mountains to get to Lituya bay.  A man is asking for a girls hand in marriage (the man is unknown).  Nagoodik'i is thought to be human, but it is a rock....Susie then begins to talk about peace making.  Building houses is mentioned, how you have to abstain from everything while building.  She talks about all taboos.  She tells how the houses are built, no hammer, no nails.  Susie talks about when the Americans bought Alaska, in Sitka the Tlingits were told to move out.  Russians and Tlingits were segregated.  Noow Tlein - a rock on Baranof Island.  Du yaa Kanagoodi (Raven walk) song is sung. This song is being taught to unidentified man.  Other unknown people arrive, and want (seems like they want) to learn this song too. Nora teaches them the words, she hopes they will sing this song.  They practice singing this song.

Item 21:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 18 Side B. Susie James, Sitka, June 7, 1973 (Tlingit & Haida meeting Juneau 1973?). Conversational speaking in the Tlingit language and signing of songs. 45 minutes in length. Content by NMD: Raven song is sung in our version (Marks Trail version) and Sitka version. In the Sitka version the words are sung different, but it doesn't matter, that is their version.  We have our own version so it is ok. Interior (Athabascan) singing and dancing is done.  They are back into Raven songs and Raven dance.  They are trying to learn our version, their version (Sitka) the words don't make sense to me.  A woman is told to be more dignified when she dances, to dance more like the men. "some women dance any old way, its ok to look over peoples head it makes you hold your head high so you don't look down, and feel scared" - NMD....Alfred Andrew's song they are singing...."everyone gave up on me, I'm the only one singing".  We (Johnny and I) start a song but we forget the rest.  Yaa haa hoowei (entrance song) is sung.  "somebody drumming really bad" - NMD  A Tsimshian  song is sung. Johnny mentions part of this song was skipped.  Another entrance song by the Athabascan.  Juneau and Haines (Athabascan) songs are sung.  Ku aani naa - an Athabascan song that goes ' where are you (random clan called out), come over and dance with us.'

Item 22:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 19. Recording of J.B. Fawcett, as interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer, Juneau, October 3, 1972; recording labeled “Kaats (bear), at Kookeidi.” 21 minutes in length. Speaking entirely in Tlingit. Content review by DK: Fawcett opens with a discussion of how the Tlingit viewed nature and the environment, then he tells the story of the Man Who Married the Bear, 0-19:30; Fawcett then discussed where this story occurred, giving the placename as Taanyoodaa, and that the people this occurred to were the Taan Yík Kwáan, 1931:-21:32.

Item 23:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 20. A.P Johnson (Kiks.ádi clan), recorded December 2, 1972, likely at Sitka. 39 minutes in length. Speaking entirely in Tlingit. Content concerns Russian and Tlingit conflict at Sitka in 1802/1804, but appears to be Part 2 as Johnson is continuing his telling. Content by DK: A telling and history of the 1802 Battle between the Tlingit and Russians at Sitka, including the Tlingit assault on the fort, burning of the fort, what the Tlingit did to Russian prisoners, Kalyaan’s role and leadership in the battle, the firefight/gun battle, and explosion of the Russian ship, 0-22:45; the song/chant that was composed concerning the conflict is presented, 22:46-27:09; the trek and continued battle, including the warrior’s trek and how they obtained their weapons from allies in Hoonah, Angoon, and Kake; then how Russians taunted the Tlingit warriors about selling Southeast Alaska to the Americans, which the warriors responded to that the land was not for sail, followed by another gun battle.

Item 24:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 21.  Lonnie Houston and white telling Glacier Bay story and singing Glacier Bay song. Copy from Sitka Nation Historical Park Collection, Reel 28-T, Sitka, 12844. (This is one of a larger set of Tapes indexed for NPS in the 1990s). Content by NMD: Chookaneidí song (no name) is a sad song (grieving) about the survivors of Glacier Bay, when the ice came down on the people.  "Lonnie uses the 'y' dialect opposed to the 'w'…I think it’s an old dialect." - NMD  mark 00:20:00 new story.  Bartlett Bay, about how it used to belong to Chookaneidí...it used to be a sacred place,  hardly visited when owned.  Bartlett Bay has a salmon river, the Chookaneidí were scared to harvest their own land, due to the whites having laws of when and where you can fish. mark 00:26:30 new story.  Raven story...begging for food. Though told that food wasn't being harvested, only driftwood (size of your index finger).  Again asks for food. This is the story of Naas, how Raven was born.  mark 00:41:30 Susie James talks about shaman spirit.  Talks about Battle in Hoonah - Chookaneidí and an unknown party.  Cheet a dwarf among the Chookaneidí, wore the wolverine blanket and mastered 'rock climbing' with 'crampons' constructed from brown bear claws.  Only one of the invaders (some say people from the south) was allowed to leave. Apparently he was starved and found a kooshdaa in a trap so he cooked and ate some of the fat.  Sick, he surrendered and left.  Kaakex'wtí killed his sleep (bat maybe?) it was flying around him while sleeping so he hit it and killed it. Kaakex'wtí had also walked from Mt. Fairweather to Glacier Bay.  He was a Chookaneidí man.  He came upon people of the Alsek.  Some call this story 'The Happy Wanderer'.  When he found the Alsek people he noticed they fished with tiny traps for 1 hooligan.  Kaakex'wtí  wove a bigger trap to catch many hooligans,  then hid away and watched.  When the Alsek people saw this they were amazed and wanted to meet this man. He would not come out. The Alsek people tried to persuade him my presenting him with a beautiful woman which he could have.

Item 25:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 22. A.P. Johnson. Sitka, circa 1972, speaking on Kiks.ádi history and Battle of Sitka (Tlingit and Russian conflict). [Possibly published in the Dauenhauer book Russians in Tlingit America (Dauenhauer and Dauenhauer, 2008).]

Item 26:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 23.  Jimmy Marks Songs, December 30, 1971. Marks Collections. 1) Chaak saaxw daa sheeyi. 2)  yan uwaajaakw. 11 minutes in length. Singing in Tlingit. Chookaneidí songs.  Love song, Eagle hat song.

Item 27:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 24.  Alex Andrews is interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer, recording labeled “Xaxaa Hit, Kaawagaani Hit, Aan Eegayaak Hit, Shaka; name of Kaagwaantaan leader Yaka.” 31 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. Content review by DK: Andrews speaks about the houses of the Kax´noowú, then talks about the origin of the Kaagwaantaan, Wolf/Eagle clan, and how their name from from Kaawagaanee Hit (the house that burned), then mention of the Aan EeGayak Hít, mention of how a title of Shuká was given to a Kaagwaantaan leader, because he was head of the clan, 0-1:57; then a story about a tínaa sacrifice, how a tínaa was obtained but then tossed into the bay in honor and recognition of the person who had passed away, 1:57-5:22; mention of a Teikweidi Bear/Eagle item of at.óow, a Brown Bear Headdress known as XaashGaash, 5:22-9:09; then a discussion and story assocated with the EeGaayak Hít and it’s at.óow, the story concerns how a young girl took a baby eagle from a nest and raised it (against her grandmother’s counsel), and they latter had children together, with her being given the name Ch’aak’ Tlaa (Eagle Mother), this is a Kaagwaantaan story, 9:09-15:37, additional EeGaayak Hít history, including about seal hunting, names of the hunters and boat are mentioned, and an accident that happened to Kaan Keek’ near a place called Kooktlaanee (near Angoon?), then the value of children, sealing near Angoon, 15:38-17:46; then a story about a small pox epidemic that killed all the people of one village but a woman, but this woman married a wasan íxt’ named Káanaxtí, and they had children; then mentions of the Kaagwaantaan houses, to the end of the recording.

Item 28:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 25 Side A.  Susie James, Sitka, May 21, 1972. . Interviewed by Nora Dauenhauer. Side A: “Mr. Charlie White, Lukaax.ádi, Yakutat; Kaasgeyi.” Note inside box reads “Susie James, Sitka, Kaasgeiy, Chookaneidi, T’akdeintaan yadi, xakw Hit Taan yadi, Xaatl Hit Taan. Collection by Nora Dauenhauer. Xeen Hit, Gaat Heenee, Naa naa.” A review of the recording documents that it contains various clips edited and spliced onto this recording, originally from a cassette. Some stories are thus incomplete and start and end abruptly. This Side of the recording contains speaking from Charlie White and Suzie James. Content from Charlie White includes; 1) talk about Lituya Bay; 2) how the Russians came to Lituya Bay in search of furs; 3) Dry Bay history; 4) song sung of how Raven makes pitch as medicine. Content from James on the recording entails a Lukaax.ádi song, Kaagwaantaan stories, T’akdeintaan and native place names. Detail of content includes; a) Susie singing a Lukaax.ádi song from the Chilkat. Susie talks about two people.  One is George Sanders Sukuyéi of Klukwan; B) Kaagwaantaan party at Wolf House. The T’akdeintaan was invited. S’aaw x’was’I” [The naming of a placename] recording stopped; C) Something was taken to the Box house and because she is talking about Kiks.ádi, it would be the Box House in Sitka; D) Susie James and Nora Dauenhauer talk about how girls were put in seclusion and how they were taught to fast during certain times. Kadulheixwaa-Kaawduls’ixwaa; E) Susie James tells a story about the moon; how two brothers made their way to the moon and walked on it; description about what the moon looks like and the colors and what it is; only one brother made it back to tell the story. James then sings the song that was composed about this story. [Recording stopped]; F) Story about when Raven’s nose came off. Also call guneit luwu. Susie sings the song; G) Story about Shark. Tóos’ –Shark asks woman to marry. Native placename Naalx; H) Song gulukdeiyi  ; I) Guwakaan- Kúl’I the deer that fell down into the ravine and raven ate it. As he ate he threw the deer fat around and that is the white we see on rocks; J) Berry pickers-picking  blueberries and they pour it into the larger containers or pots. Taal’ flat large picking container; K) Bear story and a story about how raven tore his tongue out. Raven cooked and fed another; L) Story about when Raven took his eyes out. [This story is not complete.]

Item 29:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 25 Side B. Susie James, Sitka, May 21, 1972. Interviewed by Nora Dauenhauer. Side B: Kaasgeiy, Raven Stories. Note inside box reads “Susie James, Sitka, Kaasgeiy, Chookaneidi, T’akdeintaan yadi, Xakw Hit Taan yadi, Xaatl Hit Taan.” Collected by Nora Dauenhauer. Xeen Hit, Gaat Heenee, naa naa. A review of the recording documents that it contains various clips edited and spliced onto this recording, originally from a cassette. Some stories are thus incomplete and start and end abruptly.

Item 30:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 26.  J.B. Fawcett, Juneau, August 8, 1972.  Collected by Nora Florendo.  Note inside box: Side A: 1) flood and migration, Thunderbird, Taku/song of Yanyeidi; 2) Leiw shaa shake aan;  3) first white man; 4) gaaxoo; 5) yikteiyi/song ; 6) Kooshdaa kaa/song 7)  at kookeidi/parable ?; 8) Yax at gadulku/proverb; 9) Guwakaan/peacemaker. Side B: Guwakaan song. Content by NMD: Story of the Flood and Migration.  When the Flood came, the Mountains came out of the water.  He talks about how it affected the Haida, Tsimshian, Tlingit.  Everybody is looking for a new place to live.  Explorers (white men) - Out of the Cloud People.  After new homes and lands were found the Explorers came.  He tells about riddles.  Riddle about a Bone Spearhead.  NMD asks a question, which JB didn't hear correctly (he couldn't hear that well), when asked about original question, JB tells Nora, 'If i tell you, you would be running scared.'  He tells how Tlingit used theatrics, short plays, and use them in Potlatch.  In this play someone was stabbed in the mouth and was bleeding everywhere.  Song about feathers (for theater or plays) next song is a Headdress song (for theater or plays too?).  Man named Ch'eet composed this song - Kooshdaa Kaa song.  J.B. tells Nora he likes how she asks the questions.  "This is a really valuable tape" - NMD.  Some of Nora's questions, J.B. didn't know. "That was a scary song you made me sing” - J.B. Fawcett on the Kooshdaa Kaa song.  Kooshdaa Kaa was in a leg splint that apparently J.B. had. Next J.B. tells Nora how carefully he lived as a Peacemaker.  J.B. Fawcett was known as a Peacemaker.  He tells explains about Peacemaking.  He explains about the Peacemaking Ceremony.  Next he tells about the Peacemaking songs.  A Peace song is sung.  (NMD is very excited he sang this song)

Item 31:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 27:  A.P Johnson, labeled “Kaa kaa, [Kaakáa]” undated. 20 minutes in length. Speaking entirely in Tlingit. Johnson tells stories in Tlingit, primarily about how the Tlingit hunted and harvested when he was young and with his family; mention of terrain and place names; Kushda Kwáan; and ear piercing with deer sinew. Content by NMD: Begins by telling about his family and him out camping. A bunch of Kooshdaa (land otters) came.  They were making noise around the boat.  Eventually the Kooshdaa took the oars of a man.  One Kooshdaa took an oar and placed it next to where he sat, and the man knew it was his brother.  Someone yelled on shore so they went to shore to see.  After they came ashore they ate lunch on the beach.  ...fishing for salmon, Kaakáa is saved by a Kooshdaa Káa.  Kooshdaa transformed into the wife of Kaakáa.  Kooshdaa took him and took him south.  There Kaakáa saw his Father's Sister who was also taken by Kooshdaa.

Item 32:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 28. Andrew Johnny. North Pass history.  January 20, 1997. Content by NMD: Preparing food for winter, around Glacier Bay, L'awshaa Shakeé aan - village on top of the sand mountain (Chookaneidí village).  Talks about monster sea mammals and a bug (?) Crab and Rat (?) and Devil Fish (octopus) in Sumdum Bay.  Story of hunters out on the water getting lost, others went to find them.  They didn't know what was in the water, but they were scared so they slept in the boat, when they awoke they found themselves on top of a mountain.  The Devil Fish tenticles had grabbed the boat and put them there.  They tried to escape by jumping from the boat, the Devil Fish got saw this and got mad and gave chase, breaking down trees as it went.  They fell into a hole.  The hole they fell into was home for a giant Rat. The hunters heard something splashing in the water, looking they saw the giant Rat in the water.  A waterfall was heard to the south.  Finding the waterfall sound, it was a giant Crab, with water draining out his shell.  A little girl had found a bug, she talked to it telling it to go.  This bugs sides were sharp.  The little 'beetle like' bug grew to 4 feet!  Seeing the 'beetle' the Devil Fish comes out of the water and tries to kill the bug.  The Devil Fish's ink sack broke...The giant Rats sees the fight and comes, down.  'Beetle' is now sharpening its sides on the rocks, it kills the Rat.  Early next morning the 'waterfall' sound is near.  'Beetle' kills the crab by cutting off its joints, leaving it helpless.  S' áaw Ta Aan is the location in Sumdum Bay were this took place.  Names are told of who tell this story.  Mark 00:28:00 New story... Xakúch' a Chookaneidí man (a party member on the boat?).  'This Chookaneidí story will be really good' –NMD; He tells how stories are told and how they are shared within Cedar House.  You have to know what you are talking about.  Devil Fish is rising under the boat.  Xakúch' sharpens his dagger ready to kill the giant Devil Fish.  *when hunters are gone for more than one day, they are searched for.  Many days later the Devil Fish was found with the boat inside and two men, one Chookaneidí and one Kaagwaantaan (deck hand) named Yaanal.chéen.

Item 33:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 29.  Mrs. Willard, Alice Lee, Jennie Thlunaut, Elizabeth David (From John Marks Collection). Content by NMD: We don't sing any old way/songs, we sing our songs. Sounds like Tom Jimmie. The one that we are going to sing, I have no idea who that is; it is a nice song. You will be like my God, I will raise my hand in front of you, You will be like God, I will raise my hand to you; Please here me now...It is a love song. Tom Jimmie really loved Love songs...he composed love songs...I guess people tell the truth that the world is spinning, even myself. I am always afraid to do things Shangukeidí, only you...I didn't hear the rest ...only you broke me. Singing these songs because they knew time was catching up with them, they wanted to leave something behind. Don't know what song that was. The songs are really short, and the verses are sung twice. John Marks knows what these songs are. It almost sounds like our song...I don't know this song...might be Kaagwaantaan songs...I don't know...they were going to sing this song when this guy was being taken to jail...sometimes they are singing a different song to each other...it is an Eagle song...it is about children of Raven. I'm gonna jump on number one. The composer of that song is Tawyaat. It is a Kaagwaantaan song. Another Kaagwaantaan song...

Item 34:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 30.  Emma Ellis, Chaatl Yaakw. Likely recorded by Frederica de Laguna in 1952 or 1954. Content by NMD: Emma Ellis is from Yakutat. She is singing about halibut boat. Can't understand her Tlingit. They came to ask for a wife. The song is a bridal song. That’s our song from Yakutat. When they came out from under the Alsek glacier. That’s chaatl yaakw (halibut boat). That song was composed by Kaash kéin. Please let me dream about you is what she is trying to say, let me dream of you. It was his own fault, this war. Don't feel bad about it. Let me dream about you. It's Emma Ellis that is telling the story. The one I will sing right now is my brother's, Kaaljáak.I sang this song for all of the Kaagwaantaan children. It's a sad song. The singer is Ella Ellis. I think the woman is L'uknax.ádi. [Note: recording opens with Ellis noting that she’ll be singing a Kaagwaantaan song.]

Item 35:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 31. Esther Johnson, Yakutat, undated. Label reads: Naming of Lukaax.ádi houses on Alsek River; Playing of grieving song. 6 minutes and 21 seconds in length.

Item 36:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 32.  David Kadashan, Jennie Marks, John Marks, Susie James, Haines. October 6, 1974.  1 hour and 17 minutes in length. Speaking and singing all in the Tlingit language. Content: a) Jennie gives a history of the lineage of her family; b) conversation is about Indian gambling, and gambling with the Athabascans; c) a song about snuff; d) Haines-al’ooni [hunting] song from Chilkat; e) talk about ghuwakaan, woman ghuwakaan, the protocol of this dance; f) Chookaneidi song [without an introduction, because it was understood by those present]; g) A yeik song is sung at 2 o-clock. [protocol so this must be in the A.M.]; h) Jennie and Johnny talk about a history; i) Aa Haa he yei- Gunanaa song; called “Ch’ugi Aan”; J) ptarmigan song, and discussion on proper melody of the song; k) Song made in Sitka. Yaakw daat. A ghaayak daat yeeylastaakh. Jennie mentions it is Susie James’s song; l) migration song; boat son from Sitka entitled Daak yeeylatsaakh. (Yei aya du tlaakw we atshi); m) Discussion on ghuwakaan and what the life of a chosen person should be like.

Item 37:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 33, Side A.  George Davis, Hoonah, April 1, 1973. Side A: labeled “Raven stories.” 45 minutes in length. Speaking entirely in Tlingit. Interviewed by Nora Dauenhauer. Content includes; 1) various raven stories, 2) an expression of concern about clan history, migration, and stories not being told correctly. Includes mention of the Deisheetaan and Gaanax.ádi Clans and migration.

Item 38:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 33, Side B.  George Davis, Hoonah, April 1, 1973. Side B:  labeled “Hoonah, AK.” 43 minutes in length. Speaking entirely in Tlingit. Interviewed by Nora Dauenhauer. Content includes; 1) discussion on the Alaska Native Brotherhood; 2) leadership; 3) clan stories from the Gaanax.ádi and Gaanaxteidí and the break from the Deisheetaan; 4) Taakw.aaneidí, Taku, interior, and Chilkat region; 5) and discusses similarities between the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian.

Item 39:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 34. Charlie Joseph, Sitka ANB Hall, March 17, 1981 (or possibly 4/1/73?). Interviewed by Nora Dauenhauer. Side 1: Kaaxachagook.  Side 2: Kaaksateen. Note states C. Joseph was 87 years old when this recording was made. 1 hour and 12 minutes long. Speaking and singing entirely in Tlingit. Content includes; A) Story about Káax’áach Gook. The story is told very well. [Story of the Kushda Kwaani. It was not identified in the beginning of the story, however when documented there can be an intro at the beginning of the story.] Seasons and the activities done in the seasons. He also captured how Káax’aach Gook skills on how to navigate on the waters; B) Yóo Kuwahángi Yéik story. Haa yeekukwaani [Salmon people story. Nora connecting the song with these stories. Make reference to the songs as this gets documented. Before information is lost. There is not enough in this recording unless there is extra references.]; C) Chookaneidi yádi. He is explaining to Nora as she is a Chookaneidi yadi she can use this Chookaneidi song. He sings the song. He comments about how it sounds different today, not like Nora’s great-grand parents way of singing it. ‘Kanaxhdu woos’I yé’; D) Shaawatch X’eetl’ name of Kaagwaantaan woman; E) Shungukeidi place name? Joe white’s name mentioned; F) Clan Song “We déin lihaash ax aani. Shé.”  Yeeká taught him [Charlie] the song. Same clansmen as Charlie. [Not enough information there for the researcher to anchor this song to a clan.]; G) 1919 house built. Gives important clan names. Mentions a list of Chookaneidi house names.

Item 40:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 35. Frank Williams, Geetwein, Ketchikan Yeil, Gaanax.ádi, Teikweidí Yádi, and an unidentified woman speaking. July 1973. 36 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. [last 7 minutes of recording contains music unassociated with the Tlingit]. Content includes, 1) talks of a long ago story, mentions how the Taakw.aaneidí Clan and Klukwan is connected; 2) Guna Kwáan, Tsimshian, and how they have come to this area. He said he learned this from a Tsimshian, 3) Shaak x’áak- they made a fort on the mountain; 4) Practicing of sounds of Tsimshian (?) [Because he said he got the story from a Tsimshian. I hear his voice with sounds.] ; 5) A woman begins to tell story of Heen taak Aasi ka Heen Taak atxaayi. She is talking about harvesting where one should not harvest from under the water; 6) woman began to sing “Nakw Neit Kaneegi” , Tlingit Anthem-Lukaax.ádi song. This recording contains a Lukaax.ádi song, and contains clan stories of relevance to the Gaanax.ádi and Gaanaxteidí from the Taakw.aaneidí.

Item 41:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 36. Robert Zuboff (Kak’weidí Clan, Kaakáakw Hít), 1973. Speaking on the history, culture, and Tlingit people of Tebenkof Bay, Kuiu Island. 44 minutes in length. Speaking in English for the first 30 minutes, then final 14 minutes are spoken in Tlingit with an unidentified woman. Content by NMD: Robert pronounces it  'Tebelkoff Bay' - it is actually Tebenkoff Bay.  Robert explains what happens when a stranger comes.  You have to intimidate the strangers with gunfire to persuade them to leave.  How to take Salmon, letting the first run survive, to keep the species alive. Tells how the (Sockeye) Salmon react when 'God' comes. A prophet (God) told the people not to eat the fish; unyeilding, they took the second run, building a fire up by the high water marker, and cooking the Salmon.  When tasted, the cook...Oo Oo Oo (ouch).  Eventually the people (10,000) died, except 2 young naked girls.  After the story, Richard Dauenhauer (Nora Marks Dauenhauer's husband) comes on to ask a few questions to Robert.  Story of Kaats' (different than story told by J.B. Fawcett "Kaats'", Nora and Richard Dauenhauer, Haa Shuká, Our Ancestors, Sealaska Heritage Foundation: Juneau, Alaska, 1987 and Tape 19)  Song Bear sang looking for her husband.  Susie James is present during this recording.  In Tlingit, Robert tells of many skulls he found in Tebenkoff Bay, also he found many Totem Poles.  This place was left due to Small Pox.

Item 42:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 37. Interview of Jenny Marks, Haines, July 6, 1974, about clan songs; interviewed by Nora Marks Dauenhauer. Speaking and singing entirely in Tlingit. 54 minutes in length. Label on original cassette reads “Side 1: bear song, Dakaa kina Kaawu. Side 2: Lkeetch kooshtan.” Content: Marks sings Gaanaxteidí and Lukaax.ádi songs and tells associated stories. Marks credits the original composer as being Aanti Yeili, he came from the Valley House or House-in-Between. Includes Tleiw Xixch’ from the Tsimshian and from the Tlingit Naaweidi (Reciprocity) and the Yeik song.

Item 43:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 38. Native Emphasis Week 1974 (Alaska Methodist University). 54 minutes in length; speaking in English. Program appears to concern the Tanana Athabascan people of Nenana, with concluding works by a Tlingit elder from Saxman, Alaska. Content by NMD: First speaker is not known. Trap line dance is the first song. They are Athabascans. Its sounds like the trap is the Nanana ice break. They might be Koyukon. The speaker is talking about another trapline song, and the song is about seeing many animal tracks and not catching anything. their drums are not really in tune. They are Nanana dancers. This possibly in Fairbanks. Eskimo dance. Those are the urban native dancers. They are Eskimo. AMU: Alaska Methodist University.

Item 44:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 39 Side A. Labeled “Austin’s Practice,” and appears to be a song practice hosted by Austin Hammond. Recording contains song practice and speaking in the Tlingit language. May 15, 1974, attributed to being recorded at an ANB Hall. Contains a recording of a group of individuals, some unidentified, but some names and voices recognized include Austin Hammond, Lillian Hammond, Johnny Marks, Nora Dauenhauer, Horace Marks, and possibly Jenny Marks. Content includes; Clan songs of the Lukaax.ádi and Shangukeidí. In this recording they are practicing the Shangukeidí songs as Nora writes out the words. There was a Kaagwaantaan song. Song composed for Pete Johnson. Shangukeidí song was composed by Yandu.ein (Tom Jimmy) for my namesake Guneiwtí (Nellie Willard). Historical information of at.óow, but unable to determine from audio what items are being discussed.

Item 45:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 39 Side B. Labeled “Austin’s Practice,” and appears to be a song practice hosted by Austin Hammond. Recording contains song practice and speaking in the Tlingit language. May 15, 1974, attributed to being recorded at an ANB Hall. 53 minutes long. Contains a recording of a group of individuals, some unidentified, but some names and voices recognized include Austin Hammond, Lillian Hammond, Johnny Marks, Nora Dauenhauer, Horace Marks, and possibly Jenny Marks. Content includes; Clan songs of the Lukaax.ádi and Shangukeidí. In this recording they are practicing the Shangukeidí songs as Nora writes out the words. There was a Kaagwaantaan song. Song composed for Pete Johnson. Shangukeidí song was composed by Yandu.ein (Tom Jimmy) for my namesake Guneiwtí (Nellie Willard). Historical information of at.óow, but unable to determine from audio what items are being discussed.

Item 46:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 40. Recording of the Geisun Dancers performing in the Juneau ANB Hall, July 5, 1975, speaking and singing primarily all in Tlingit, groups led by Austin Hammond and Nora Dauenhauer. Original label on recording reads; “Juneau ANB Hall, July 5, 1974.” Contains various songs, some tied to specific clans, including the Luknaax.ádi, Gaanaxteidí, and Shangukeidí. Final few minutes contain two individuals speaking about the event’s purpose; that being for the betterment of the Tlingit people. 1 hour and 10 minutes long.

Item 47:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 41. Audio recording of Tom Peters (Deisheetaan Clan), Teslin, Yukon, August 29, 1973. Speaking in the Tlingit language. 63 minutes in length. Content includes; a) Khat; story of a man saved by a brown bear, woman and brown bear story; b) telling of Strong Man story [published by Dauenhauers?]; c) mention of Benny Johnson Yanyeidi; d) Gaanax.ádi mention; e) telling of the Cannibal story [story connects to the Ishka Hit poles in Klukwan].

Item 48:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 42 Side A. Tom Peters (Deisheetaan Clan), Teslin, Yukon, August 29, 1973. Labeled “Side A:  1) Tlanaxeedakw; 2) Tlanaxeedakw; 3) Hintayeeshi.” 46 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. Content review by DK: Tom Peters tells what is known as the Lucky Lady Story or the Gunaxéekw.akw, 0-20:21; continues a story about a man named Natsál, who became wealth, with mentions of this story’s connection to Gunaxéekw.akw, 20:21-30:55; Peters continues with a story about the Giant Octopus, and concludes with a comparative analogy of these difficulties compare to the difficulties faced by the Tlingit when they first settled the coast, 33:58-46:07.

Item 49:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 42 Side B. Tom Peters, Teslin, Yukon, August 29, 1973. Side B: 1) Hintayeeshi; 2) Xootsx xayaakuwdliyadi shaawat (as published in Haa Shuka); 3) Tom Peters genealogy; 4) Gooch. (Box and Tape labeled Y. 2.).  Content by NMD: 1.Giant bug story- A bug was raised by a man for revenge. 2. The Brown Bear story- the brown bear was telling his wife, "whenever you go pick berries or hunt, you go put on my skin." She would come out on the mountain with her two cubs, her brothers were telling their mother, "we just want to play with our sister" and she would turn into a bear. She told her mother "every time I put my husband's skin on, I'm never the same. Let me just stay with you for as long as I can." They put in their arrowheads only tree bark; they didn't have real arrowheads. One of them was using a real arrow with a stone head, and the boys went to play. The first arrow that hit her, she made a noise, she growled. When that happened, she killed the boys. The brother with the real arrow killed her and her cubs. Nora commented Tom Peters's other name is Koolch'ál'ee. Continue from time mark 20:45

Item 50:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 43. Tom Peters, Teslin, Yukon (August 29, 1973?), recording labeled “Y.111.) Side 1: The women who were captured by the wolf. Side 2: blank.” 27 minutes in length. Speaking in Tlingit. Content by DK: Peters tells a migration story, the Lukaax.ádi going into the interior and the conditions the environment presented, including wolf attacks, and the story of the Child of the Wolf, 0-18:05; then switches to discussing medicinal plants; 18:05-20:30; then Nora Dauenhauer asks Peters about the wolves and Tlingit interaction, but how Tlingit law governed interaction with the wolves, 20:30-22:18; then Nora tells Tom about her work of collecting oral traditions, how one should go about this process, and what it means to collect oral traditions, 22:18-27:13.

Item 51:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 44. Johnny Frazer. Champagne, Yukon, August 28 or 29, 1973; Telling the story of Bear Husband. Content by NMD: My aunty Jennie told me that Johnny Frazier was adopted by Jack David from Haines, AK. His name was Tinaa s'aatée. He is talking about a soap that he uses to wash his face. I don't know what it was. He asked "Are you in a hurry". I said no. He talks with m's instead of w's. She said that a relative of his went down to see Austin Hammond...she knew Austin. I wanted him to clarify that. He is working on a skin; I don't know what animal it came from. He is talking about a Martin skin blanket. He's telling me how to sew a Martin skin blanket. Telling the blanket to shut up. Grandpa was 70 years old; I am telling him my father was 70 years old. His mother was an orphan and she grew up in Chilkat. He is telling me that I am his relative and this is why he is telling me his genealogy. He is talking about his wife; she died of cancer; her liver was swollen. He is gonna start on the brown bear and the man story. He said when the older people would tell the stories, the children would stare at the faces of the story teller. He is connecting his people to ours. They are on British Columbia territory...he is talking about Dry Bay...they were our adopted relatives...they found us there. They had copper...that's Dry Bay people. .copper is good to trade. His namesake is the one that bought the tinaa from the Dry Bay people...when our ancestors had grandchildren they would name them for the Tinaa...the Dry Bay people...my namesake, the baby was put on the copper plate. He said that Jessie George had the tinaa for safe keeping. He was the only one left from the newgakwon...he is half Tlingit. His mother was Athabaskan and his father was Tlingit...so he considered himself to be Tlingit...he speaks Tlingit pretty well. People knew me in Klukwan because i am part Tlingit. He wouldn't tell me the raven story. He said I am an old man and I am beginning to lose my senses...he does not know what happened to it...he is getting senile I guess. He said he is losing his mind. I asked him if he knows about the brown bear story...the that married each other. He is telling the story...the women went after yanaeit...the brown bear pooped on the road they were walking along. She insulted the bear by saying YUK...i wonder why they pooped right on a place where people walked? She told her mother that a young man came by me...he was a young man. She went with him after she saw him again. Let's go and build ourselves a home is what the bear told her...she did not know that he was a bear. Shall we go and live at the edge of the cliff...this is what the bear told her...she forgot all about her family. They built a home. They were sleeping and after awhile...she woke up and saw how big he was. She did not know what to do. She knew she must have insulted the bear. They were talking in Tlingit. After a long time a bunch of dogs came to their entry way. The bear said I am going to go out there...she told him that that was his brother-in-law...he comes up here with the dogs. They killed the bear. She gathered up the arrows and bundled them. The boys killed the brother-in-law. She talked to her younger brother and let him know that it was his brother that he killed...take care of him. The older person said. Someone said to me to take good care of the body of the bear...the six elders said this to him. In the past they used to cremate the deceased...they chopped wood and put the brown bear on their...the woman told her brothers to tell her mother to come up with my clothes. She went up to see her daughter and her daughter was naked and saw that her daughter was growing half like a brown bear. That is the end of that story. I gave him seaweed. Seaweed is very expensive to get in Southeast. He said one of the women was his namesakes daughter. I knew who she was.

Item 52:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 45 Side A. Recording of a regional koo.éex’ for David Hammond [?] at Carcross, Yukon, dated October 13, 1973. 46 minutes in length. Speaking and singing in Tlingit. Many people speak on this recording, the bulk by Nora Dauenhauer and Austin Hammond, but also includes Lillian Hammond, Richard Kin, Mary King, and Minnie Smith.

Item 53:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 45 Side B. Recording of a regional koo.éex’ for David Hammond [?] at Carcross, Yukon continued, dated October 13, 1973. 46 minutes in length. Speaking and singing in Tlingit. Many people speak on this recording, the bulk by Nora Dauenhauer and Austin Hammond, but also includes Lillian Hammond, Richard Kin, Mary King, and Minnie Smith.

Item 54:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 46. Carcross, Yukon. October 13, 1973 ( Side A labeled Carcross III, Side B labeled Carcross IIII, box labeled Carcross II). Content by NMD: Davis.  Jennie, Johnnie, Nora, and an Unknown man go for a car ride.  The car ends up at the grave site of David Hammond a cry song is sung.  This part of the tape is really special, we are taken to the grave site where more speeches are given and much emotion is released.  Eva Davis gives a speech.  An 'elder' (unknown) gives speech.  Willie Marks gives speech.  Richard Keen [King?] ~ Goochooxóo a Kaagwaantaan man from Haines gives a speech.  Unknown speaker.  George Davis leads the ceremony again.  Back at the hall where ceremony is taking place, the Potlatch resumes with more speeches from George Davis.  Another 'cry song' by Lukaax.ádi people.  And another 'cry song' buy Lukaax.ádi.  The clapping after the 'cry songs' is not needed.  It is a song of mourning that shouldn't be applauded.  Not everyone knows this.  An unknown man sings a song 'in answer' to the 'cry songs'.  Willie Marks gives speech.  The at.óow' is brought out.  'They are gonna shout the sadness out of themselves' - NMD.  These shouts are made four (4) times, the Tlingit 'magic' number, in each shout they 'follow the sun', turning 90 degrees or 1/4 of a full circle each time.  Johnnie Marks is requested to sing.

Item 55:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 47 Side A. Carcross, Yukon. October 13, 1973 (Side a labeled Carcross IIIII, box labeled YKN 2). Content by NMD: "They are having a good time." - NMD (even though they gather for memorial of a loved one. ) Lukaax.ádi song by Johnnie Marks and others.  Johnnie Marks knows all those Lukaax.ádi songs.  Faintly, you can hear Jennie Marks comment on how someone sang the song wrong.  Nora Marks Dauenhauer is now requested to sing.  They (Nora and Johnnie) decide to sing Yées Kustí a Lukaax.ádi song translated to 'modern life'. Next Lukaax.ádi song (sung by more people) - 'I'm carrying with me, for the last time, your happiness'.  "There are no names for the songs, I'm just telling you the first line of what it's about." - NMD  Solo song is sung by Jessie Dalton (a guess) it is an unknown song.  'Go for broke' another Lukaax.ádi song is next.  David Andrews and Jimmy Marks dance in their naaxein (Chilkat robe) and shakee.át (dance headdress).  Johnnie Marks starts the next Lukaax.ádi song, Jimmy Marks is Shi Kaneek - 'leads' or 'calls out' the song.  All songs should be sung Shi Kaneek; essentially that is the shouting or yelling the following line during the song.  Shi Kaneek tell the rest of the singers what to sing, they yell out what to say, and the rest of the group follow with a melodious repetition or the description of what was yelled.  Interior song and dance comes next with hard, loud, and heavy drumming, drowning out the vocals.  Last 10 - 15 minutes of recording is random conversation of the crowd.

Item 56:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 47 Side B. Carcross, Yukon. October 13, 1973 (Side B labeled Carcross 6, box labeled YKN 2) Content by NMD: Recorder set aside as they are handing out the food now, maybe berries or fruit.

Item 57:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 48 Side A. Carcross, Yukon. October 13, 1973 (Side A labeled YKIN 4 on sticker, but 5 in inks. Box labeled YKIN 3).  Content by NMD: Recorder set aside as they are bring out dáanaa (money).  Lillian Hammond gives thanks speech.

Item 58:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 48 Side B. Carcross, Yukon.  October 13, 1973 (Side B labeled Carcross 6, Box labeled YKN 3). Content by NMD: Austin Hammond gives speech.  Followed by an unknown song by unknown man - "he's trying to sing it 'modern' style." - NMD ; They are bring out the money to count.  Charlie Able?  Gives speech of respect and thanks for all Indians and People.  George Davis requests everyone's attention for a speech.  Lukaax.ádi song by Johnnie Marks; it is for women about the 'hat coming back', it is done with yarn tassels hung from the ears.  Another Lukaax.ádi song is sung. An unknown song is next.  Peter Mark's song is next 'why are you drunk' - funny song.  At the end, someone was given the name Chanaa.

Item 59:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 49. Audio recording and interview of Charlie Joseph, Sitka, ANB Hall, October 25, 1980, Interviewed Nora Dauenhauer; interview in Tlingit. Content includes; a) Joseph is preparing a speech for an event; b) discussion of protocol and arrangement of clans at a koo.éex’; c) discussion as Nora edits Joseph’s speech forthcoming publication Because We Cherish You; d) story of how the Teikweidí game a tinaa; e) discussion of songs to be sung. Mention of a Revenue Cutter; and some discussion of a motion dance in English and Tlingit. 47 minutes in length.

Item 60:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 50 Side A. Mary Pelayo 40-day, Sitka. October 25, 1980 Tape 1. Content by NMD: Annie Dick is one of the hosts.  Kaat'eix is Chookaneidí. Chookaneidí Cry songs after a few speeches from Annie Dick, Charlie Joseph, and unknown others. Fundamentals of a Memorial can be found in "IV. The General Structure of a Tlingit Memorial", Nora and Richard Dauenhauer, Haa Tuwunáagu Yís, for Healing Our Spirit, Sealaska Heritage Foundation: Juneau, Alaska, 1990.

Item 61:              Oral Literature Collection; Tape 51 Side A. Mary Pelayo, 40-day, Sitka. October 25, 1980, Tape 2. Content by NMD: Happy songs and having a good time. Thanks is given to the guests. Chanting or 'calling out' is sending Kaat'eix Mary Pelayo to the spirit world

Item 62:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 51 Side B.  Mary Pelayo 40-day, Sitka. October 25, 1980 Tape 2. Content by NMD: Money and gifts are beginning to come out, after more thanking. The chanting is 'sending' the money to the spirit world. A name is given. Annie Dick is adopting a brother, as there are only women left in her family. 'Dance behind the blanket' is done before the money is distributed.  Eagles singing and dancing with the crowd.

Item 63 Tape 52 missing or perhaps it was mislabeled.

Item 64:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 53 Side A.  Mary Pelayo 40-day, Sitka, October 25, 1980.  Tape 1 (of a separate recording from 50-52? Or possibly Tape 4 in the same sequence?).  Content: Beginning of CD is hard to hear, it is a guest giving thanks.  Prayer in English is given.  Ray Nielsen, a Chookaneidí,  gives thanks.  Ray Nielsen's father gives speech, name unknown.  Unknown lady gives a speech, has her family gather around her as she gives thanks. A Chookaneidí (the hosts) woman is thanking the guests for coming to Mary Pelayo's 40 day party.  Mary Pelayo's nephew gives his thanks to the guests, name unknown.  Charlie Joseph explains to the people their name and who and why they are there. "It's sad when they clap hands, after a speech, they don't understand" - NMD

Item 65:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 53 Side B.  Mary Pelayo 40-day, Sitka, October 25, 1980.  Tape 1 (of a separate recording from 50-52? Or possibly Tape 4 in the same sequence?). Content by NMD: George Dalton gives a speech.  Also explaining to the people who they are and what it is to be Tlingit.  He started off saying "we are in need of Tlingit language, I will speak in Tlingit". Ray Nielsen announces a traditional Chookaneidí cry song is to be sung half way, as they are not done yet.  This song is from Glacier Bay, it was conceived when the Glacier pushed the people out, displaced them.  While the people (Chookaneidí) fled Glacier Bay they sang this song.

Item 66:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 54.  Mary Pelayo 40-day, Sitka, October 25, 1980. Tape 2 (of a separate recording from 50-52? Or possibly Tape 5 in the same sequence?). Content by NMD: Unknown speaker coming from Hoonah.  It is a big thing when somebody comes from afar.  That is why when somebody comes from far, it is announced.  Unknown tells jokes and funny stories about their relatives, then gives his thanks.  Believe this is the last tape in the series, with a final song.  They sing with no drum as they don't have one.

Item 67:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 55.  Chookaneidi memorial, Cedar House, Hoonah October 10, 1976.  Memorial for Houston, Wright, Martin, Hinchman. Tape 1, Sides A&B (Variously dated 10-9-76 and 10-10-76. Tapes 55-60 are in this sequence, with Sides labeled alphabetically A-J, with an extra “I”). Content by NMD: Memorial for Houston, Wright, Martin, Hinchman. Good spirits of mass conversation, singing, eating and laughing during a Chookaneidí song.  Another Chookaneidí song.  These are Sitka Chookaneidí. Lukaax.ádi are guests.  A Chookaneidí man Keet Yaanaayí (Willie Marks) speaks.  Another song, followed by a brief speech from Stoowukáa (George Dalton).  Then they dedicate the money gathered to the deceased.

Item 68:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 56.  Chookaneidí memorial, Cedar House, Hoonah.  October 10, 1976 Memorial for Houston, Wright, martin, Hinchman. Tape 2, Sides C & D. Content: Story is told of a war in Hoonah.  More thanks is given, along with random  mass conversation.  Naming of money givers and amount.

Item 69:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 57.  Chookaneidi memorial, Cedar House, Hoonah.  October 10, 1976.  Memorial for Houston, Wright, martin, Hinchman.  Tape 3, Sides E & F. Content by NMD: More money is given and who gave.  Kooteen (Amy Marvin) is announcing.  Mary Johnson is present giving more and more.  Naming of all NMD father's relatives.  Mary Johnson's husband is giving her a lot of money and a box of many things.  The money is being sent to 'spirit world'.  Before money came, material items were given.

Item 70:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 58.  Chookaneidi memorial, Cedar House, Hoonah.  October 10, 1976.  Memorial for Houston, Wright, martin, Hinchman.  Tape 4, Sides G & H.

Item 71:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 59.  Chookaneidi memorial, Cedar House, Hoonah.  October 10, 1976.  Memorial for Houston, Wright, martin, Hinchman Tape 5, I & J. Content by NMD: Money total is given.  Singing and Dance is done behind the money.  It’s a spirit dance. Another spirit dance is done, during this song the eagle down is released.  Eagle down represents peace.  A woman from Sitka giving a speech, thought to be Annie Dick, she introduced the man with her.  The Ravens are going to sing a song.  They are naming as icebergs (calving of the glacier, breaking off from the whole)  they named them as the Iceberg house.  An unknown speaker.  Austin Hammond is giving a speech.  They are trying to find out who people are..."raise your hand when we call out your name."  Money is being given to the Ravens.

Item 72:              Oral Literature Collection Tape 60. Chookaneidi memorial, Cedar House, Hoonah.  October 10, 1976.  Memorial for Houston, Wright, martin, Hinchman.  Tape 6, Side 1 (sic, should be K). Content by NMD: Fruit is sent out, and the Ravens go crazy for it!  How fun.  Nathan Jackson 'baby raven'.  Songs are sung all the guests get up and dance.  Telling of the glacier calving, and the sea gulls go out and get the plankton that is brought up from the wave.  Food is served.  Annie Dick gives a speech after the meal.  She was given some berries that she will pass out.  Final song is sung at the end.

Item 73:              No disc, appears to be mis-numbered.



Page Generated in: 22.484 seconds (using 193 queries).
Using 7.94MB of memory. (Peak of 8.2MB.)

Powered by Archon Version 3.21 rev-1
Copyright ©2012 The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign